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Michael Vick Talking Dynasty With Eagles

The supposed “Dream Team” of last year’s Philadelphia Eagles didn’t even make the playoffs. A year later, Michael Vick surveyed his team’s roster and declared it worthy of not just one Super Bowl, but many.“When I look at our football team and what we have on paper, I think about when I was growing up and the great San Francisco 49er teams, the great Green Bay Packer teams, and the great Dallas Cowboy teams, how they just positioned themselves to compete and be one of the best teams out there,” Vick said.“I think we have a chance to be that. I think we have a chance to develop a dynasty,” he said on Comcast Sports Net Philadelphia.That’s big — outrageous? — talk for someone on a team that went 8-8 last year and has not even gotten into training camp for the upcoming season. But Vick said it is not just his feeling.“I think it’s just a mindset for my organization on down to the players,” he said in the interview. “We know we can do it. We know what we have, that’s the great thing about it. We know what we have as a team, as an organization and what better position to be in than to know that you have an opportunity?”They had an opportunity last season, adding quality free agents to the point where backup quarterback Vince Young dubbed the Eagles the “Dream Team.” It did not work out so well. The Eagles did not mesh as a unit until it was too late.This off-season the Eagles issued  big-money extensions to players already on the roster, like wide receiver DeSean Jackson, running back LeSean McCory and defensive end Trent Cole. They added two-time Pro Bowl lineback DeMeco Ryans in a trade with the Houston Texans.Vick said the Eagles are in a “special place” now. And while the Super Bowl is the ultimate goal, having a strong regular season is the immediate goal.“I think just getting to the postseason right now is our focus,” he said. “The Super Bowl is going to come if it’s meant to happen. Some of the best teams have some of the best luck. Maybe we’ll have some of that. I think our focus needs to be one game at a time, just getting into the postseason.” read more

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OSU womens ice hockey looks to get back on track vs Minnesota

OSU then-junior defenseman Cara Zubko (2) passes the puck during a game against Minnesota on Nov. 15 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost, 5-3. Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternFrom the Schottenstein Center, its temporary home rink for the weekend where it practiced in advance of its weekend series against Minnesota State, the Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is confident that it can get back on track after dropping four straight contests.Despite being outscored 33-4 during its losing streak, the team is remains sure that it is headed in the right direction.“We continue to work to improve in areas that we want to get better, but also emphasizing all the things that went well,” coach Jenny Potter said. “Sometimes people look at the box score and don’t see what really happened.”Getting betterPotter stressed trusting the developmental process her team is on all season as an indicator of their success, and that doesn’t always mean to look at the final score, even though she still expects to win games.“Saturday was a challenge for our team, but I think the way I’m working them, they’re tired, that’s not an excuse, they’ve got to find a way to compete and not give up,” Potter said.The Minnesota State team coming to Columbus this weekend presents something of a different challenge. Under first-year coach John Harrington, the Mavericks are 2-4, losers of three straight. But OSU does not want to stop to catch its breath after four straight losses.“We don’t know where we stand against these teams, and we want to look at every game as if we’re playing against a No. 1 team no matter who it is,” junior forward Claudia Kepler said.Kepler, who scored twice against Minnesota last weekend, is also adamant that the squad has only made positive strides in recent weeks.“We’re buying into the process. We understand that in order to get stronger we have to get weaker and we’re breaking ourselves down, but now we’re starting to build ourselves up,” Kepler said.If the Buckeyes want to find where they stand in comparison to their conference opponents, this weekend represents as good as starting point as any.  The first order of business is solving the problem of the middle frame. Against Minnesota, OSU allowed 10 second-period goals.“I think Saturday was a little deflating after the second period. I thought they were right in that game for sure, but again they’re feeling their legs a little more, and Saturday that second period was a challenge, and you know what, with any challenge you’re going to find your character and figure out what you want to be,” Potter said.Overcoming fatiguePotter said she believes her skaters are the most fatigued they will be at any point this season right now, but that does not stand as an excuse not playing well for an entire game or weekend. “Staying mentally focused for three periods,” Potter said. “The conditioning part, and what I’m doing with them, right now they’re in the beaten-down stage. So, every week after this they’re going to continually get better and get into better shape.”Potter’s skaters are not looking for additional rest before another potentially exhausting series. To the contrary, they are working even harder in search of wins.“We’ve set aside time before practice this week to get out there early to work on our shots and stickhandling,” senior defender Cara Zubko said. “It’s the little things that are going to make a big difference.”OSU believes that attention to detail will translate into success starting this weekend.Kepler described her goal last Friday as “playing until the end,” and that more of that type of effort is necessary for her squad to be successful.“It would build our confidence to get some of those grinder, put-in goals early,” Kepler said.  “Then we’ll go from there.”Potter, who said she believes that the scores of games are not representative of her team’s effort, echoed that sentiment.“I think that they came out there and played an unbelievable first game, they gave it everything they had,” Potter said. “I told them, ‘you guys are a good enough team, you’re good enough to compete, if you want a couple of wins you have to go get them.’”OSU is set to drop the puck against Minnesota State at the Schottenstein Center at 6:07 p.m. on Friday and 1:07 p.m. on Saturday. read more

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Football Ohio State still believes in Austin Mack

The Buckeyes line up to sing “Carmen Ohio” after the game against TCU on Sept. 15. Ohio State won 40-28. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorGoing into the 2018 season, junior wide receiver Austin Mack was pegged by many as the next “go-to guy” in the Ohio State offense. With the amount of short-yardage receivers that serviced the type of offense former Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett ran, including redshirt senior receiver Parris Campbell and redshirt junior K.J. Hill, Mack, with his vertical ability, seemed to compliment the new player behind center, redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins. Through the first two games of the season, Haskins and Mack met that expectation. He was targeted nine times, bringing in eight catches for 89 yards against Oregon State and Rutgers, respectively. That same expectation seemed like it was going to continue during the first drive of Saturday night’s game against TCU. Mack brought in two targets for 64 yards, adding a 48-yard reception to bring Ohio State into the red zone for the first time against the Horned Frogs. Then, something happened. Haskins looked back to what had been his most reliable receiver up to that point in the end zone, a 3-yard slant route across the middle of the field. With an open opportunity, Haskins fired, throwing the ball to a receiver who was known for his hands. The ball hit Mack in his gloves and bounced into the turf. Possibly viewed a a fluke for a receiver known as having one of the surest hands in the receiver room, Haskins targeted Mack again on a 2nd-and-16 in the first drive of the second quarter. Another target, another drop. This happened two more times. Mack, who had brought in eight of nine targets in his first two games, recorded four drops in nine targets against TCU. As an older player in the wide receiver room and one of the team captains for the Ohio State offense, Campbell took it upon himself to be there for Mack, to make sure he was still there mentally despite his lack of success. “All of the guys, we were just telling him that at the end of the day, you just have to let it go,” Campbell said. “We need every single person on the team. We knew it was going to be a four-quarter fight and at the end of the day, we needed to clear his head and I think he moved on from that.” But Haskins knows who Mack is as a receiver. With a close relationship off the field as his roommate, the redshirt sophomore quarterback said he was going to continue to target Mack, continue to trust his receiver even through the trouble. “There are going to be plays you mess up. I’m going to keep coming to you though, throwing you the ball,” Haskins said. “It was hard for him having those drops like that in key moments for that game, but he kept pushing. I relied on him in the big moments and he came through for me.”Acting head coach and offensive coordinator Ryan Day thought the same thing, saying Mack is usually a “reliable guy” with his hands. Even without the success he is expected to have, Day said Mack is not the kind of player that the Ohio State offense can give up on. “When you go into a fight, sometimes you are going to be hit and when you get hit, you can’t flinch,” Day said. “We didn’t flinch, you know, we kept putting Austin back in there and then he dropped one and he came back in and he made a catch and then he made another catch.” Mack finished the day with four catches on nine targets for 84 yards, the most yards he has recorded in a single game since Oct. 28 when he had 90 yards on six catches against Penn State. Day said he knows who Mack is as a receiver: a vertical deep threat who compliments his quarterback very nicely in the passing game. One misstep in that does not change Day’s overall view of him. “We believe in our guys, we know what we see every day in practice,” Day said. “We trust that some days, you know, guys are going to put one in the ground and we don’t like that, but we believe in our guys and when things don’t go well, we have to stick together.” read more

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Robins AFB to Add 1200 jobs to Aviation Depot

first_imgThe Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex at Robins AFB, Ga., will be hiring 1,200 personnel by the end of 2019 after the depot experienced its “most consequential year for new workload growth in over a decade,” Brig. Gen. John Kubinec, the complex’s commander, said Wednesday. “Just over a year ago they rolled out the very first Global Hawk we did here,” Kubinec said. “We have inducted our very first J-STARS aircraft for [programmed depot maintenance]. We have brought in our first Marine Corps C-130 for overhaul.”The Air Logistics Complex, which now employs 7,200 people, will need to hire engineers, mechanics and computer scientists, reports the Telegraph. Kubinec praised Congress for providing direct hire authority, which will allow base officials to hire candidates on the spot following a job interview. The additional workforce will generate an annual economic impact of $69 million, according to statement from the base located in Middle Georgia. About 24,000 people work at Robins now.Telegraph photo by Jason Vorhees Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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DNA as invisible ink can reversibly hide patterns

first_img The researchers, Jian Liang and Giacinto Scoles from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Matteo Castronovo from Temple University and CRO-National Center Institute in Aviano Pordenone, Italy, have published their work on using DNA as invisible ink in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. To write with DNA as invisible ink, the scientists used a nanolithography technique called nanografting, in which nanostructures are written using an atomic force microscope. Unlike other nanolithography techniques, in which nanostructures are written on top of a surface, nanografting first removes the original molecules in the scanning region and then writes new molecules in their place. Using this technique, the scientists first covered a gold surface with a monolayer of thiolated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules using a self-assembly process. Then they embedded the same type of DNA using nanografting into the thiolated DNA background. At this point, the nanografted DNA pattern is invisible, as it has the same thickness and chemical makeup as the background. However, the nanografted DNA is different from the self-assembled DNA background in that the nanografted molecules have a tighter packing order. Although the packing order is invisible under the initial conditions, a tighter packing order makes the nanografted DNA more sensitive to hybridization. The scientists found that performing a hybridization process that involves immersing the DNA film in a fluid containing the complementary DNA (cDNA) increases the thickness of the nanografted DNA much more dramatically than that of the self-assembled DNA. As a result, the nanografted DNA pattern emerges and becomes visible.By dehybridizing the DNA film, the researchers could reverse the thickness increase and make the DNA pattern invisible again. To dehybridize, the researchers incubated the DNA film in ultrapure Milli-Q water for several hours, and the pattern disappeared. The researchers found that they could repeat the hybridization/dehybridization process multiple times, and the pattern could still be switched between visible (“on”) and invisible (“off”) with high fidelity.The scientists noted that this ability to write, read, and erase is not very common in nanolithography. This novelty makes the DNA invisible ink an intriguing discovery that could be used for manipulating biological molecules and generating new encryption technologies. The encryption ability could also be combined with other techniques such as DNA stamping, which allows patterns to be transferred using a programmable, reversible, and recyclable mold. (PhysOrg.com) — While most people know of DNA as the building blocks of life, these large molecules also have potential applications in areas such as biosensing, nanoparticle assembly, and building supramolecular structures. And now scientists have added another use to the list: invisible ink. More information: Jian Liang, et al. “DNA as Invisible Ink for AFM Nanolithography.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI:10.1021/ja2076845 Explore further (A) ssDNA is nanografted into a background of self-assembled ssDNA, with both having the same height (“off” state). (B) Hybridizing the ssDNA reveals the hidden pattern (“on” state) due to the increased height of the nanografted DNA. (C) Dehybridizing reverses the height increase (“off state). (D) The pattern is restored. (E) and (F) show the height of the pattern in the “off” and “on” states, respectively. Image credit: Liang, et al. ©2011 American Chemical Society Citation: DNA as invisible ink can reversibly hide patterns (2012, January 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-dna-invisible-ink-reversibly-patterns.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Journal of the American Chemical Society Copyright 2012 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. DNA falls apart when you pull itlast_img read more

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