Month: June 2021

Andrew Hore benched for Chiefs clash

first_imgDUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND – APRIL 07: Kade Poki of the Highlanders makes a break during the Super Rugby round seven match between the Highlanders and the Stormers at Forsyth Barr Stadium on April 7, 2012 in Dunedin, New Zealand. (Photo by Teaukura Moetaua/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Known for his raw power and elusive running style, Kade Poki is the only backs changeHighlanders’ Head Coach, Jamie Joseph, has named his team to play the Chiefs at Forsyth Barr Stadium in Dunedin on Friday.  He has made five changes to the run-on team that played the Crusaders at AMI Stadium a month ago.Four changes have been made to the Highlanders forward pack with Ma’afu Fia returning to the front row replacing Chris King, who drops to the reserves.  Jason Rutledge also starts this week with All Black Andrew Hore joining front row partner King in the reserves. Nick Crosswell starts at lock in place of Josh Bekhuis who started against the Crusaders.The final change in the forwards is Tim Boys who will start at openside flanker ahead of James Haskell.In the backs only one change has been made with Kade Poki returning to the starting fifteen on the right wing in place of Kurt Baker. Highlanders v ChiefsFriday, 29 June 2012 at Forsyth Barr Stadium, DunedinKick:off – 08:35 BST Starting XV:15 Ben Smith, 14 Kade Poki, 13 Tamati Ellison, 12 Phil Burleigh, 11 Hosea Gear, 10 Chris Noakes, 9 Aaron Smith, 1 Jamie Mackintosh (c), 2 Jason Rutledge, 3 Ma’afu Fia, 4 Jarrad Hoeata, 5 Nick Crosswell, 6 Adam Thomson, 7 Tim Boys, 8 Nasi ManuReplacements:16 Andrew Hore, 17 Chris King, 18 Josh Bekhuis, 19 James Haskell, 20 Jimmy Cowan, 21 Mike Delany, 22 Buxton Popoali’ilast_img read more

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Is the new global rugby calendar as good as it sounds?

first_imgWorld Rugby have announced a new rugby calendar for 2020-32 – Rugby World looks at what it means On the move: South Africa and Ireland played three Tests last June but that window will move to July in 2020. Photo: Getty Images A global rugby season has been at the heart of many a discussion since the game went professional 20 years ago and last week World Rugby announced a new ‘optimised’ international calendar for the period 2020-32.It’s not quite the ‘global season’ many envisaged, where everyone around the world would start and end their seasons at the same time. Still, some of the top-line changes should lead to the growth and development of the game worldwide.But is this new calendar really as good as it sounds? And is player welfare, World Rugby’s “number one priority”, truly at the heart of the changes? Rugby World looks at a few of the key points…A new July Test windowThere are a few changes to the international windows. The November window will move forward one week, so Tests will be played in the first three weeks of the month, and the World Cup window will also be cemented in the calendar but from 2023 will start one week earlier, in the second week of September.Set schedule: From 2023 World Cups will start in the second week of September. Photo: Getty ImagesThe biggest change, however, is that the current June window will be moved to July. This means Super Rugby can be completed before the SANZAAR countries host northern hemisphere teams in a Test series. These will comprise of three Tests in the first three weeks of the month, apart from in the years after a World Cup when just two Tests will be played. The other benefit of the switch, according to World Rugby, is to promote “optimal preparation time”.Premiership Rugby have confirmed that there will be two weeks between their final – now to be played at the end of June – and the first Test of England’s tour. An improvement on previous situations where the England players involved in the final had to hop on a long-haul flight a day or two after the domestic season’s climax ahead of a Test the following weekend. For example, in 2014, England’s first Test against New Zealand was seven days after the Premiership final.It’s good that the impact of a World Cup on players has been recognised with the reduction of the subsequent tours reduced from three Tests to two, although removing them from the calendar altogether might have been better, and it’s right that the club competitions were involved in these discussions and that the new schedule is looking to support their growth – but has player welfare really been the top priority?Player welfare at heart of the decision-making processThis was one of the key points made by World Rugby when they announced the new calendar and the International Rugby Players’ Association (IRPA) were involved in the discussions in San Francisco in January. They talk about “prioritising rest periods”. Yet drilling down into the detail, it’s not clear where these fit in.Let’s look at the European leagues. Premiership Rugby’s plan is to start in September and finish at the end of June. It is likely that the Pro12 follow a similar schedule for they will need to be in line when it comes to determining when European games will be played. The Top 14 tends to start a little earlier, in late August, (they have four more fixtures to play) and finish at the end of June.Hotting up: The Premiership final will be moved to the end of June. Photo: Getty ImagesSo if we take an England international, this is how their year would look: Start playing league rugby in September, three Tests in November, Six Nations in February-March, Premiership final last weekend of June, three Tests in southern hemisphere in July, five-week rest period, back in training towards the end of August.Players would still be limited to 32 games a campaign and it is compulsory that they have five weeks of rest before returning for pre-season training, but it’s still an 11-month season.Yet if they’re not returning to training with their clubs until the last couple of weeks in August, they could only have a two- or three-week pre-season. Okay, clubs will use individual management programmes for their international players and might hold them back until, say, October so they can fit a longer conditioning period in, but what if they endure a terrible start to the season or are hit by injuries in a certain position? This isn’t an ideal world, it’s reality. Circumstance could conspire to mean that some international players need to turn out in that first league game.Even if they don’t, will they still have a long enough pre-season? There have been endless interviews with players when they extolled the virtues of having a full pre-season. It’s the chance to get over any niggles and develop the fitness base needed to play elite rugby, as well as a mental break from the pressure and even the ‘grind’ of professional sport. Will the curtailing of this pre-season period lead to more injuries and/or drops in performance?When talking to Rugby World last year about the sheer volume of rugby being played, IRPA executive director Rob Nichol said: “The key to this is being able to firstly ensure players get a period of rest, followed by a period of conditioning where they get adequate time to prepare for a competition and playing season. We feel between 12-14 weeks, possibly more, is required to achieve this.”Hard graft: Auckland Blues at Bethells Beach sand dunes during pre-season training. Photo: Getty ImagesWell, this structure doesn’t seem to get close to this for international players while even those not playing Tests or other international competitions – they could be back in club training three or four weeks earlier – would fall short.It’s clear why Premiership Rugby want to extend the season to the end of June. It means there are less overlaps between league games and Test matches. At the moment games are played both in November and during the Six Nations. Reducing the clashes means those clubs who provide the most international players should be able to pick their strongest team more often, rather than losing players en masse for Test periods when they might also have key league fixtures. The rankings after World Cups will also be used to determine which Tier Two nations are included in the schedule to ensure the top emerging teams are given Tier One fixtures on merit. For example, if Germany continue to make strides – and no doubt rugby’s powerbrokers would love to see that happen given the commercial opportunities in the country – we could see them playing at Twickenham or the Stade de France before 2032.In all, this is a hugely positive move for the continued growth of the game worldwide.Mooted Six Nations and Lions changesIt has been reported in The Daily Telegraph that the Six Nations is set to be reduced to six weeks when this new calendar is introduced, with one of the fallow weeks removed. Again, has player welfare been properly considered?Yes, teams play more games in a shorter period in a World Cup, but they have been building up to that tournament for months in terms of their fitness programmes and rest periods so they are in peak condition.The Six Nations is played in the middle of the northern hemisphere season when players’ bodies are already feeling the effects of a gruelling fixtures schedule. Take Scotland’s injury list during this campaign. After the France game in Paris, not only were Josh Strauss and Greig Laidlaw ruled out of the tournament but around half the 23-man squad weren’t fit enough to attend the post-match function. If there hadn’t been a fallow week following that game, they would probably have been without even more players for the Wales fixture.Injuries will always have an impact on the championship but halving the fallow weeks is likely to make that impact even bigger.Body blow: Greig Laidlaw suffered an ankle injury against France. Photo: Getty ImagesIt has also been suggested that future British & Irish Lions tours will be reduced to eight games from the current ten. This comes down to balancing tradition, and the very essence of Lions tours, with player welfare. Ten games is already considered a short tour when you are trying to combine players from four nations into one team to take on the best Test sides in the world. If rugby’s powerbrokers want the Lions to have a realistic chance of winning Test series, they need ten-game tours; otherwise there simply isn’t enough time to hit upon the best combinations before the first Test.However, such a tour at the end of a long season is a huge strain on players. Would it work to shorten the club season and scrap the Anglo-Welsh Cup (or equivalent) in Lions years, perhaps playing the finals in early June and allowing the touring squad time to prepare? Then starting the following season a couple of weeks later so players get adequate rest/pre-season time? And then ensuring all Lions players have a longer mandatory rest period upon their return? TAGS: Highlight center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lengthening the season also means players can be rested at different points of the campaign – a weekend off here and there – but the question of how players can complete an effective pre-season is the one looming over this new calendar.A 39% increase in Tier One v Tier Two fixturesThere will be a minimum of 110 Tier One v Tier Two matches played between 2020 and 2032 – a huge increase. The aim is to provide more “meaningful fixtures” for emerging nations and this should help those countries to become more competitive. As Warren Gatland has so often pointed out: You only get better by playing the best.Take Georgia. They have enjoyed a lot of success in the top Rugby Europe competition for a while, so last year World Rugby helped to arrange a tour to the Pacific Islands, where they were unbeaten, and they also played Scotland in the November window. Those Tests against different and/or better opposition will no doubt have aided their development. Japan, too, could only progress so far when they were thrashing all-comers in the Asian 5 Nations, so more competitive fixtures for these teams is key.The SANZAAR unions are committed to hosting Tier Two nations in the new July window and the Six Nations unions will host a guaranteed six Tier Two fixtures each November (basically one each). Georgia and Romania will host matches against Six Nations unions in July, the USA, Canada and Japan will also host tours, and France and England are among those countries who will tour the Pacific Islands in this 12-year period. It’s a tricky problem to solve in the modern era with crowded schedules, but with all of this player welfare should be the leading factor in making any of these decisions.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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Lions 2017: Why Warren Gatland’s insider knowledge was key

first_img Tall order: Warren Gatland in front of the Remarkables mountain range in Queenstown. Photo: Getty Images Fine voice: The Lions sing during their official welcome in Waitangi. Photo: Getty Images“And then understanding, as a Kiwi, everyone has their strengths and weaknesses in their culture, as a country. There are strengths in New Zealand as a nation, in terms of the isolation and being so far away and galvanising themselves, they are prepared to have a go at anything. But there can be cracks at times as well.“I don’t think the All Blacks are very vulnerable, but last week there were a few comments made that I hadn’t expected. There were signs there we could build on, to have some confidence and self-belief. Often when you play All Blacks teams in New Zealand that’s the biggest challenge – to get 15 players going on the field believing they’re good enough to win.”FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREAsked for specifics on what comments had given him hope in the lead-up to that decisive third Test, which was drawn 15-15, Gatland replied:  “Someone mentioned the result and said that if they lost the sun would still come up tomorrow and it wouldn’t be the end of the world and they would learn from that experience. Those are comments that you don’t hear very often coming out of the New Zealand camp.“There were a couple of wee things where you think, ‘We can build from that’. We could create confidence and self-belief because we’d earned that respect from them to make those sort of comments.”Gatland also believes the threats the Lions posed – say their line speed in defence, their kicking game and so on – caused New Zealand to tweak their style of play, when the norm is for them to just focus on their own strengths.“The All Blacks are the masters of being the ones who never worry about an opposition,” said Gatland. “It’s always about themselves. They always pick a team for themselves.Chat show: Steve Hansen and Warren Gatland talk after the third Test. Photo: Getty Images“We felt that tactically we made them play a little bit differently. We think they picked a team to combat some of our strengths and they don’t normally do those types of things. I think that’s a sign of respect for what we had achieved as a team.” “Set a Kiwi to catch a Kiwi.” So said British & Irish Lions manager John Spencer of Warren Gatland after the tourists defied expectations to draw the series with back-to-back world champions New Zealand.Spencer believes the fact that the coach is a New Zealander helped the Lions to understand the Kiwi mindset/culture/psyche/insert other word as you see fit. “You have to be a very shrewd coach to come to New Zealand and achieve what the players achieved,” said Spencer. “I will tell you without doubt I think he’s the best head coach in the world.“You can’t hope to beat the All Blacks unless you understand the people and their culture, their way of life and attitude to rugby. Warren does understand the New Zealand psyche and there were plenty of instances on tour when he has proven that.”Sea of red: Lions fans show their support during the third Test in Auckland. Photo: Getty ImagesEver since he was appointed coach, Gatland recognised the scale of the challenge and has joked that he thought he was on “a hiding to nothing”. Yet it was the challenge that so appealed, coming to the country of his birth and taking on the best team in the world, and it is one that Gatland rose to.“It is one of those positions that you are offered and it’s very difficult to walk away from,” said Gatland. “Having the chance to come to New Zealand, trying to win down here, is the ultimate challenge.“If I wasn’t offered the position, it would have been fine. Once I was offered the job, you can’t walk away from that sort of challenge, particularly someone like myself, when you are competitive. I think if anyone else had been doing it, we might not have drawn the series.”Super surge: Maro Itoje on the charge during the third Test at Eden Park. Photo: Getty ImagesSo why was his insider knowledge as a Kiwi so crucial in the Lions leaving New Zealand with a share of the trophy?“When you go somewhere different, from my experiences having lived in Ireland and England and now Wales, if you have some understanding of the culture it gives you a massive advantage,” he said.“I was lucky enough when I went to Ireland at a young age that I’d done Irish history at university. I had that understanding of the relationship between the North and the South, and to be able to have conversations with people about that… people respect that understanding.“In the past people have come to New Zealand and haven’t been prepared about culturally what you’re facing. So we made sure that we prepared properly in terms of the welcomes and having to sing and stuff. It’s probably the best way. There is already talk of Gatland taking the Lions reins in South Africa in four years’ time, and why shouldn’t there be? He’s undefeated as Lions head coach, guiding the best of Britain and Ireland to their first series win in 16 years in Australia in 2013 and, four years later, drawing a series with the All Blacks that many predicted would end in a 3-0 defeat.He was involved in the 2009 tour to South Africa but Ian McGeechan was in charge so being at the helm in 2021 would make it a hat-trick as Lions head coach – and the prospect of taking on the Springboks could well be one that appeals. Unless, of course, the All Blacks come calling after the 2019 World Cup… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Coach Warren Gatland’s insight into New Zealand culture played a crucial role in the Lions drawing the series with the back-to-back world champions TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Rugby’s Greatest: Philippe Sella

first_img Thierry Dusautoir won the IRB Player of the… Balance and power: Philippe Sella mesmerised opponents the world over during the Eighties and Nineties Rugby’s Greatest: Agustin Pichot Collapse Rugby’s Greatest: Thierry Dusautoir Rugby’s Greatest: Thierry Dusautoir LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby’s Greatest: Philippe SellaFor becoming the first player to win 100 Test caps, Philippe Sella is guaranteed a place in rugby’s hall of fame. The gallery of leading French threequarters is adorned by the portraits of artists who were touched by genius, but when he retired as the game’s most-capped player in 1995 he had 111 caps and was universally appreciated as one of rugby’s old masters.Sella had entered the French side in the autumn of 1982, playing on the wing after gaining the unusual distinction of winning school, youth and student honours.As a stripling with a zest for total rugby, he was a fast and elusive runner. But the natural toughness and easy fitness that went with his rural Garonne upbringing perfectly equipped him for a role in the French XV at centre, a position he quickly made his own.The quality that marked Sella out among the panoply of brilliant French threequarters was the range of his skills. His flair for attacking rugby placed him on the same pedestal as the Boniface brothers, Jo Maso, Didier Codorniou and Denis Charvet. Agustin Pichot was Argentina’s greatest scrum-half, and to… When he retired in 1994 as the world’s best all-round centre of the decade, he left a huge vacuum in les Bleus back-line. One that, arguably, the French have never managed to fill.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. But the extra dimension to his game that his illustrious predecessors lacked was stoical defence. By his own admission Sella relished making a clattering tackle as much as any of the 30 Test tries he scored.In Brothers in Arms, Patrick Estève recalls: “In the 1984 game against England, [John] Carleton did a scissors with their centre and he came down Sella’s channel. He just smashed him. I stood there and watched in awe at his timing, technique and power.”Yet Sella was a lethal finisher, too, and his bagful of tries included one in each Five Nations match in 1986, when he became only the fourth player in the championship’s history to perform the feat, and a lung-bursting 65-metre score against England at Twickenham in 1987 that bore all the hallmarks of his class. France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide TAGS: The Greatest Players Major teams: Agen Position: CentreCountry: FranceTest span: 1982-95Test caps: 111 (110 starts)Test points: 125 (30T) All you need to know about Les Bleus… Rugby’s Greatest: Agustin Pichot Expand Expand France Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guidelast_img read more

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Ireland Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020

first_imgFind out which players Andy Farrell has picked for the new tournament Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Round OneFriday 13 Nov, Ireland 32-9 Wales Related: James Lowe scores in Ireland’s win over WalesRound TwoSaturday 21 Nov, England 18-7 Ireland Related: Jonny May scores first-half braceRound ThreeSunday 29 Nov, Ireland 23-10 Georgia Related: Ireland fail to impress as Georgia register first points Finals WeekendSaturday 5 Dec, Ireland 31-16 Scotland Related: Ireland finish third in Autumn Nations CupHead here for the full Autumn Nations Cup fixtures list. Coach and captain: Andy Farrell talks to Johnny Sexton (Getty Images) center_img Ireland Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020Andy Farrell enjoyed a mixed first campaign as Ireland head coach, finishing third in the Six Nations after three wins and two defeats, and they then finished third in the Autumn Nations Cup.Ireland Team to Play Scotland – Saturday 5 DecemberJacob Stockdale; Hugo Keenan, Bundee Aki, Robbie Henshaw, Keith Earls; Jonathan Sexton (capt), Conor Murray; Cian Healy, Rob Herring, Andrew Porter; Iain Henderson, James Ryan; CJ Stander, Peter O’Mahony, Caelan Doris.Replacements: Ronán Kelleher, Eric O’Sullivan, John Ryan, Quinn Roux, Josh van der Flier, Jamison Gibson-Park, Ross Byrne, Chris Farrell.Ireland Team to Play Georgia – Sunday 29 NovemberJacob Stockdale; Hugo Keenan, Chris Farrell, Stuart McCloskey, Keith Earls; Billy Burns, Conor Murray; Finlay Bealham, Rob Herring, Andrew Porter, Iain Henderson James Ryan (captain), Tadhg Beirne, Will Connors, CJ Stander.Replacements: Dave Heffernan, Cian Healy, John Ryan, Quinn Roux, Peter O’Mahony, Kieran Marmion, Ross Byrne, Shane Daly.Ireland Team to Play England – Saturday 21 NovemberHugo Keenan; Keith Earls, Chris Farrell, Bundee Aki, James Lowe; Ross Byrne, Jamison Gibson Park; Cian Healy, Ronan Kelleher, Andrew Porter, Quinn Roux, James Ryan (captain), CJ Stander, Peter O’Mahony, Caelan Doris.Replacements: Rob Herring, Ed Byrne, Finlay Bealham, Iain Henderson, Will Connors, Conor Murray, Billy Burns, Jacob Stockdale.Ireland Team to Play Wales – Friday 13 NovemberHugo Keenan; Andrew Conway, Chris Farrell, Robbie Henshaw, James Lowe; Johnny Sexton (captain), Jamison Gibson Park; Cian Healy, Ronan Kelleher, Andrew Porter, Quinn Roux, James Ryan, Peter O’Mahony, Josh van der Flier, Caelan Doris.Replacements: Dave Heffernan, Ed Byrne, Finlay Bealham, Tadhg Beirne, Will Connors, Conor Murray, Billy Burns, Keith Earls.Ireland Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020ForwardsFinlay BealhamTadhg BeirneEd ByrneWill ConnorsUltan DillaneCaelan DorisCian HealyDave HeffernanIain HendersonRob HerringRonan KelleherPeter O’MahonyAndrew PorterQuinn RouxJohn RyanJames RyanCJ StanderJosh van der FlierBacks Bundee AkiBilly BurnsRoss ByrneAndrew ConwayShane DalyKeith EarlsChris FarrellJamison Gibson ParkRobbie HenshawHugo KeenanJames LoweKieran MarmionStuart McCloskeyConor MurrayJohnny SextonJacob StockdaleIreland Autumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020Dates, kick-off times and TV details for Ireland’s four Autumn Nations Cup matches… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Episcopal Relief & Development to offer webinar on Netsforlife®

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Health & Healthcare Posted Apr 12, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Relief & Development, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Tags Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Relief & Development to offer webinar on Netsforlife® Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal Relief & Development] In commemoration of World Malaria Day, Episcopal Relief & Development invites you to join us for a special webinar on April 17 to share the work and accomplishments of NetsforLife®.Learn about NetsforLife®’s innovative approach, the significant impacts in the field, and the gains made in malaria control.  You’ll hear from Episcopal Relief & Development staff including Robert Radtke, Samuel Asiedu Agyei, and Abagail Nelson.  This is your opportunity to learn more about this program and how you can be part of sustaining these gains made in communities throughout sub-Saharan Africa.Since 2006, NetsforLife® has been a leader in malaria prevention by distributing over 7.7 million nets and reaching over 37 million people in 17 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, resulting in less sickness, fewer deaths and stronger communities.  The program combats malaria by educating community members about proper net use and maintenance, training community agents to deliver life-saving nets, and providing ongoing monitoring and evaluation of net use.Please Call in and Join us! Click here to register.Date: Tuesday, April 17, 2012  Time: 6:00 PM Eastern. Registrants will receive call in information via email. Thank you for signing up.  Space is limited so please register early. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

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La Iglesia Episcopal crea un fondo para los soñadores

first_img Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis]  Este fue un gran día para los jóvenes episcopales, la resolución D067 conocida como la “Resolución para los Soñadores”, fue aprobada por ambas cámaras. Esta resolución insta a las diócesis a investigar y solicitar recursos de fuentes  privadas para crear  un fondo para los jóvenes indocumentados que no pueden pagar sus estudios superiores y a que luego inviten a los jóvenes adultos de sus diócesis y provincias a postular por estas becas.Esta Resolución fue presentada  por Ariana González-Bonillas, (16) de la Diócesis de Arizona, Miembro de la presencia oficial de los Jóvenes, quien  trabajó con el Rev. Watkins LeeAnne de la Diócesis de Minnesota.González-Bonillas apoyó su resolución ante el comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales y ante la cámara de Diputados en la 77ª  Convención General con un testimonio personal:  “Mi padre  fue un inmigrante indocumentado, nació en la ciudad de México en una familia pobre, su familia se mudo a California, en la secundaria el considero ingresar al ejercito de los estados unidos para ganar la residencia y eventualmente la ciudadanía, en el 1996 el Presidente Reagan firmó la Ley de Reforma de Inmigración y Control lo cual permitió que él y mi familia nos convirtiéramos en inmigrantes legales; eso permitió que mi padre postule e ingrese al Instituto de Tecnología de Massachusetts (MIT, Massachusetts Institute of Technology). Ellos se casaron por la iglesia episcopal y él tuvo su ciudadanía justo antes de que yo naciera, me bautizaron en la iglesia episcopal cuando yo tenía 6 meses. Gracias a la amnistía que permitió a mi padre tener estudios superiores, estoy parada aquí para ayudar a mis hermanos/as episcopales que no tienen documentos y que no pueden acceder a estudios superiores por el costo y que no tienen acceso al financiamiento y tienen que hacer tres trabajos bajo la mesa en vez de estar estudiando, por eso apoyo esta resolución”.Nora Viñas, de la Diócesis del Sur Este de la Florida dio su testimonio a favor, en el mismo comité: “Mi mejor amiga y su familia se mudó a los Estados Unidos en agosto de 2001, todas vinieron con visas que durarían hasta seis meses y sus padres, tenían todas las intenciones de iniciar el proceso de inmigración.  Sin embargo, un mes después de su llegada, sucedió el  9/11 y el cambio de leyes anti-migratorias cerraron el camino legal para que ella y su familia obtengan sus documentos. Han pasado 11 años desde que ellos no han regresado a su país, once años de penurias, lucha y sacrificio, y todo porque sus padres soñaban con una mejor educación para su hija. Mi amiga dejó de soñar con ir a la universidad después de que se gradúe de la secundaria (…) Hay millones de jóvenes como ella, que han dado su vida a Cristo y se dedicaron a la iglesia. Ellos merecen que la gente crea en ellos. Ellos merecen el apoyo de la iglesia para que alcanzar sus sueños y sobresalir en el país de las oportunidades. Ellos merecen un cambio”.El último el testimonio escuchado en la cámara de los Diputados fue a favor y dado por Darling Gabriel de la Presencia Oficial de Jóvenes de la República Dominicana “Pienso que si nuestra iglesia tiene la oportunidad de ayudar a estos jóvenes que desean superarse debe de hacerlo,  ya que de esta manera la iglesia estará construyendo nuestra sociedad y contribuyendo a evitar los delitos y malas actitudes de jóvenes de hoy en día”.En la Cámara de Diputados se manifestó en contra de esta resolución Elizabeth Strickland, diputada de la diócesis de Albany, diciendo: “Entiendo que indocumentados  son los que no tienen estatus legal en este país, a mi me gustaría que los fondos de la Iglesia Episcopal vayan a los jóvenes que son legales en este país”.— Araceli Ma es miembro del equipo del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal en la Convención General. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Por Araceli MaPosted Jul 12, 2012 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET La Iglesia Episcopal crea un fondo para los soñadoreslast_img read more

Read More La Iglesia Episcopal crea un fondo para los soñadores

Five big questions about the ‘Jesus’ wife’ discovery

first_imgFive big questions about the ‘Jesus’ wife’ discovery September 25, 2012 at 2:18 pm Students of the first century and early Christianity often point out that it was “expected” that a Jewish rabbi would be married. Some say, “it was virtually required and a Rabbi not married would have been somehow morally suspect?!” New Testament personalities, disciples, enemies, and friends usually called Jesus, “Rabbi”. It could even be surprising if He were not married?! Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Press Release Service September 21, 2012 at 4:24 pm I think it is a very interesting discovery. Assuming that the papyrus is genuine it seems to be a fourth-century fragment of a probably late second century lost gospel, probably Gnostic in origin. Perhaps one day someone will find more of it. It could be that its author thought Jesus had been married, or it could be that he was using the phrase metaphorically. Historically speaking, it says nothing of Jesus’ actual marital status. As Barbara Harris once said, in the ancient world marriage was a contract between two men — the groom and the father of the bride. As such it was a major instrument for the subjugation of women, and I am doubtful for this reason that Jesus would have bought into it by being married himself. I do think, however, that he had women apostles, such as Mary Magdalen and Joanna, mentioned in the New Testament. John Speller says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ecumenical & Interreligious September 21, 2012 at 4:29 pm I’m curious about no. 5. Why does what the Vatican think/say about it matter? If the Vatican says “yes” does it mean the document is authentic? Associate Rector Columbus, GA September 24, 2012 at 12:45 pm The Vatican as it represents Roman Catholicism is very influential. Whether Christians around the world like it or not, what the pope says does affect non-Roman Christians. Were the Vatican to agree with the text (which would be silly) and then it was proven the text was a forgery then the Vatican would either have to back-step quickly or somehow attempt to defend its authenticity, both of which would embarrass the Vatican. It’s a smart move for the Vatican to stay silent. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Julian Malakar says: September 21, 2012 at 10:43 pm All these are wild speculation and some special interest groups try to change Christian’s believe by inducing confusion out of a single card size piece of paper with two words “my wife”. These special groups not weighing with biblical evidences that build up the Bible, draws conclusion that they found evidence that Jesus Christ was married. It is like the story of “Elephant and the blind men.” The Christian faith is not built in a day by a single piece of paper with mere two words. Jesus Christ is Son of God, who is alpha and omega and saves everybody’s souls who believe Him and repent. The Rev. John T. Farrell says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Ecumenical News International] In a surprise announcement that seemed scripted by the novelist Dan Brown, a Harvard professor revealed an ancient scrap of papyrus on Sept. 18 that purports to refer to Jesus’ wife.The so-called “Gospel of Jesus’ Wife” presents a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples, said Karen King, a well-respected historian of early Christianity at Harvard Divinity School, Religion News Service reports.The fourth-century fragment says, “Jesus said to them, ‘My wife …,’” according to King. The rest of the sentence is cut off. The fragment also says “she will be able to be my disciple,” according to King. The discovery that some ancient Christians thought Jesus had a wife could shake up centuries-old Christian traditions, King suggested.But even King acknowledged that questions remain about the receipt-sized scrap, which contains just 33 words and incomplete sentences. Here are five of the biggest questions.1. Where did the papyrus come from?We don’t know. King says that “nothing is known about the circumstances of its discovery,” an admission that has raised red flags for other scholars.King speculates that the fragment may have been tossed in an ancient garbage heap by someone who objected to the idea of Jesus being married. Christians fiercely debated celibacy and marriage in the first centuries after Christ’s death.The papyrus now belongs to an anonymous collector who asked King to analyze it. King says three scholars have determined that the fragment is not a forgery, but that further tests will be conducted on the ink. The scholar also says that she will press the fragment’s anonymous owner to come forward. 2. Does it prove that Jesus was married?No. King says the fragment is a fourth-century translation of a second-century Greek text. It’s not quite old enough to prove that Jesus was married, King says — only that early Christians discussed it. “The earliest and most historically reliable evidence is entirely silent about Jesus’s marital status,” King says.King also acknowledged that Jesus might have been speaking figuratively when he referred to “my wife.” After all, the fragment is just 33 words long, with incomplete sentences and very little context. 3. What do other ancient texts say about Jesus being married?The Bible, of course, says nothing about Jesus marrying, though New Testament writers occasionally used the metaphor of the church and God’s people as the “bride of Christ.”Some of the Gnostic gospels — ancient texts unearthed in the 20th century that are not included in the Christian canon — suggest that Jesus had an intimate relationship with Mary Magdalene. The apocryphal Gospel of Philip, for example, says that Jesus kissed Mary, and loved her more than the apostles.But the Gnostics were often intimate in nonsexual ways. In the Gospel of Philip, for instance, Christians greet each other with kisses to convey the sense that they are a spiritual family, according to scholars. 4. Will this change contemporary Christianity?King said her discovery could cause believers to rethink their assumptions about early Christian debates over marriage, celibacy and family. Those early arguments led to contemporary practices like the Roman Catholic Church’s all-male, mostly unmarried priesthood.Perhaps King is correct — nearly everything is open for debate in Christianity these days. After all, Christians are still arguing over homosexuality, the role of women in ministry and whether priests should marry.But how many overhyped archaeological discoveries have proven less than world-changing under careful examination?Remember the Gospel of Judas? He didn’t betray Jesus! Or did he? “The Gospel of Judas was so packed with opaque Gnostic metaphor that scholars are still debating whether it portrays Judas as a hero or a villain,” said Gary Manning, an associate professor of New Testament studies at Biola University in La Mirada, California.The so-called James ossuary then? As Roland Meynet, a biblical scholar at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, said Wednesday, “that made a lot of noise on newspapers, but was then revealed as a fraud.”Even if the new papyrus “were proved true, it would mean that there is a new apocryphal text from that time, as there are many,” Meynet said. “It won’t reopen the debate and, anyway, we must wait for verification and be very cautious until we know the origin of the fragment.” 5. How will the Vatican respond?If the Vatican’s new communications team is as good as they say it is, Rome will stay silent.The Vatican and its media-savvy friends in Opus Dei said all they needed or wanted to say about Jesus’ marital status during the whole “Da Vinci Code” saga a few years ago. They will likely let scholarly surrogates debate this one, while the hierarchy sits on the sidelines.The Vatican insists that there’s nothing new to debate about the gender and celibacy requirements for its priesthood. It’s unlikely that a business card-sized scrap of papyrus of dubious origin is going to change that.Or perhaps Pope Benedict XVI, himself a renowned scholar, will indirectly enter the fray over the fragment. He just finished his third and final installment on the historical Jesus. It will be published around Christmas, and will likely be as well received as the previous two, and sell as strongly.(Alessandro Speciale contributed to this report from Rome.) October 4, 2012 at 4:26 am Where the proverbial “rubber meets the road” is do you live out your life on the Gospels rather than on secular values? Married or not is not a key question or issue in the faith of core christianity. The Roman Catholic history had married clergy…so celibacy is an administrative tool for deployment and dedication to the task without the obligations of being a spouse and parent. If you can recruit and retain spiritual leadership it works very well as seen by their use of that discipline. The RC’s never said that there was anything fundamentally wrong with marriage and the fact that it is a sacrament is proof of that. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC September 24, 2012 at 11:10 am I do agree that that what some people refer to “state of life” (married, single), does not affect the teaching of Jesus. I have had in my formation many teachers, great teachers, smart, committed, honest, and truthful ones. I have never asked them, and that has not been my concern if they were married or single. Also, let us remember that Jesus indeed was truly human, and his culture gives to us a lot of information about him. FS Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Joseph F Foster says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY September 30, 2012 at 12:21 am With increasingly fewer exceptions, and with those exceptions having increasing difficulty credibly defending their discrimination, most Christians don’t regard Jesus’ sex as determinative for clergy. I’m wondering how it is that people would conclude that Jesus’ marital status is rightly regarded as any more prescriptive for clergy, much less for laity. I’m wondering also why people would attach such significance to a document as though its words alone would be authoritative. Even the scriptures themselves are subject to reasoned scrutiny and translations of scripture to informed challenge; and rightly so. If one wishes to consider the issue of Jesus’ marital status, one should do so. But one would do well, I think, to avoid referring to this fragment as informative on the topic. Prof. King has moved too quickly and claimed too much. Its authenticity and the accuracy of the published translation remain suspect. Even if somehow proven at last to be a genuine fourth century Coptic text, it is purely speculative to assume that it would have an earlier corollary in the second century Church. Even granting this non-scholarly leap, student of the early Church and of the Koine texts of the New Testament are aware that a plethora of texts and fragments thereof exists that make claims equally challenging, if not more so, in comparison to one claimed for this fragment. They can make for interesting reading and provocative of fruitful thought. But when it comes to any question of clerical celibacy, there are many arguments against it, thanks be to God, that are more persuasive and far more intellectually credible than simply trying ‘to do what Jesus did’ based on the incomplete and suspect text of a small fragment of papyrus. I hope people don’t infer more about this thing than is due. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. September 25, 2012 at 1:46 pm Who would possibly care what our (not so very) friends in the Roman ecclesial community think about anything? September 22, 2012 at 5:56 pm Professor Karen King’s fragment discovery of a non-canonical gospel that refers to Jesus speaking of his wife will not change the nature of Christianity and its diverse traditions. For many early Church Christians Jesus was a Jewish Rabbi and a moral reform teacher. His radical moral teachings, such as the moral and religious imperatives for unconditional love (Agape) and free forgiveness of offenses as opposed to Mose’s teaching of “Lex talionis” or “tooth for a tooth and an eye for an eye . . . hand for a hand and foot for a foot . . . .” were central to his moral and religious reformation of Judaism. These new teachings led to protest and rejection by the conservative leaders of the mainline (Jewish) religious establishment of his time. His private personal life as a Jewish man of his time seems to have been culturally acceptable and traditional enough not cause any questions or moral or religious concern. It was traditional for most Jewish males to get married. This cultural practice included both Rabbis and Priests. Marriage was not considered as a source of moral pollution to exclude the married from positions of religious leadership. For instance, Moses was married and allegedly Prophet Hosea married a prostitute as a religious symbolism for God and his covenant people, who worshipped other gods! If Jesus and Mary were married, it would not suprise us. It would enhance his stature as a man of his time and and his teachings on morality would be taken more seriously because they would also be rooted in his own experience. He elevated the status of women and children. Prophets Moses and Muhammad were married and their married experiences enhanced their ministry. It would be the same with Jesus and his followers. A married priesthood would also be the model for Christianity as opposed to a forced celibate one, which has also proved to be unpractical and in some cased dysfunctional.Professor Emmanuel K. Twesigye, OWU, Delaware, OH, USA September 25, 2012 at 11:40 pm On point #2-what 2nd century Greek papyrus is being referred to? The parallels between the late Coptic version of the Gospel of Thomas and the Greek Oxyrynchus fragments are well known. This fragment does not fit into that category. A vague reference to an unsubstantiated 2nd century Greek fragment seems more an attempt validate this Coptic text’s antiquity, than a clear statement of fact. Not every 4th century Coptic fragment of uncertain origin has an earlier Greek original. Jim Stockton says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Fr. Charles W. V. Daily says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA John Kirk says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Teresa T. Bowden says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Fabio Sotelo says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 22, 2012 at 7:14 pm Personally, I see little reason to be swayed one way or another by a 4th century text, especially one that’s incomplete. How do we even know it’s referring to Jesus of Nazareth? And if it is, why should I place my faith in it, rather than the church fathers of the 1st and 2nd century none of whom mentioned Jesus being married? The Episcopal Church claims to be founded on the true and accurate transmittion of the Apostolic church. I find it a little disturbing, even as a Roman Catholic, to hear an ordained cleric stating, that they have “soul-felt feeling” that Jesus was married. If you claim to follow the faith of the apostles how can you add or detract from what they said? The earliest Church fathers taught that Christ was celibate, so isn’t that what the Episcopal Church believes? Could it be that the Epsicopal Church is essentially lying when they say every Sunday that they believe in the Apostolic Church? Wouldn’t it be more honest to do what the ELCA does and just get rid of the Nicene Creed all together? I am not trying to be accusatory, rather I am encouraging an honesty. I just don’t see how you can believe in the Apostolic faith and yet deviate from such a core teaching of those apostles, or perhaps the apostles of the apostles? To an outsider it looks a lot like the clerics of the Episcopal Church pick and choose what they want to believe and don’t really care about the ancient teaching of the Church. Perhaps this allows a greater freedom of discernment in the Holy Spirit, I don’t know. It just seems silly to claim an apostolic faith and then claim something as radical as Jesus being married. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Andy Hook says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 21, 2012 at 4:51 pm I have a soul-felt feeling that Jesus was married and to Mary Magdalene. I am not a scholar. My thinking is that, not only were several of the apostles married, and Jewish culture preferred men the age of Jesus to be married, it is very possible that Jesus was married. I realize the Bible does not mention this part of the life of Jesus. I think that the New Testament writers did not believe it was an important item to mention as it was a normal part of the culture. I believe that several details were probaly omitted for the same reason. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Robert Smith says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (16) September 21, 2012 at 8:27 pm This whole matter has been exhaustively discussed in relation to Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code. The very questionable research on which he bases his implication that Jesus was married to Mary Magdelene, suggests that their descendents are represented in those connected to the House of Lorraine in France. This sillines actually implies that I am a descendent of our Lord, having Lorraine antecedents. I don’t think my DNA, etc. would substantiate that–but who knows? (I really don’t think so!!) The Rev. John M. Kettlewell, Rector, St. Stephen’s Church, Schuylerville, New York. October 12, 2012 at 5:04 pm It’s an atavistic reaction, Rev. Farrell. Deep down, even the most rebellious child wants a respected and revered father’s approval, even as he outwardly scorns it (From a member of the ecclesial community to which you refer). P.A.Getchell says: Michael Graebner says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 24, 2012 at 9:06 pm Even if it should turn out that Jesus of Nazareth was married, it need not have much effect on the Latin, i.e. Western Branch, of the Roman Catholic Church’ general administrative practice of a celibate clergy. As I understand it, this is an administrative policy and not a theological one. Many of the secular clergy in the Byzantine and other Eastern Rite Churches in full Communion with the Bishop of Rome / Occidental Patriarch are married. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Hamish Henderson says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Rev. John M. Kettlewell says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Professor Emmanuel Kalenzi Twesigye says: By Daniel Burke and David GibsonPosted Sep 21, 2012 Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Read More Five big questions about the ‘Jesus’ wife’ discovery

Rapidísimas

first_img La crisis provocada por la enfermedad del presidente Hugo Chávez cada vez se profundiza más. Venezuela está viviendo momentos difíciles y se temen desenlaces como un golpe militar y aún una guerra civil. Las recientes conclusiones con respecto a la transmisión de poder han causado aún más comentarios. Afirman que lo hecho el jueves 10 de enero no tiene justificación y viola la historia y la Constitución venezolanas. Diego Arria, el ex-embajador de Venezuela ante las Naciones Unidas, declaró al Nuevo Herald de Miami que “se ha iniciado una presidencia de facto y ha nacido un régimen cívico-militar controlado por Cuba y avalado por el Tribunal Supremo de Justica”. La propuesta de la oposición de enviar una delegación médica a La Habana para que informe sobre el estado de salud de Chávez, fue rechazada sin que se dieran respuestas convincentes.Entre bastidores se habla de las pugnas internas que pueden traer dolor y sangre al pueblo venezolano. También se habla de lo que esto puede significar para los países del Alba que dependen económicamente de Chávez. Una manifestación celebrada por el oficialismo en Caracas el jueves mostró sus ideas socialistas y sus planes de extenderse por el resto de América Latina, dijeron medios de prensa. La decisión de la Corte Suprema de Justicia es vergonzosa, dicen abogados constitucionalistas. La cúpula de la Iglesia Católica Romana ha advertido de los peligros que se ciernen sobre el país si se sigue la actual situación. Esperemos lo mejor para la querida patria de Bolívar.La Iglesia Anglicana de Kenia ha protestado por la decisión de la Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia de Inglaterra de hacer elegible al episcopado a sacerdotes homosexuales. “Esto trae más confusión acerca de la doctrina moral anglicana y hace más difícil la unidad”, dijo Eliud Wabukala, arzobispo de Kenia.Después de encuestar 200 países, la Fundación Pew revela que los casi 600 millones de habitantes del mundo pertenecen a uno de estos tres grupos: cristianismo, la religión con más fieles a la que pertenecen más de un tercio de los habitantes del planeta, seguido por el islam. En tercer lugar están los que no tienen filiación religiosa, los ateos y los agnósticos.La oficina de comunicaciones de la Comunión Anglicana en Londres informa la reaparición de Anglican World una revista gráfica que tendrá circulación internacional. Enhorabuena.La compañía Coca Cola ha lanzado una campaña a nivel mundial en un momento especialmente duro, donde impera cierto pesimismo y tristeza en muchos países provocado por la situación de crisis económica mundial. La campaña titulada: “Volvámonos locos” ¿Locos de qué? “De hacer cosas buenas por los demás”. Un anuncio sugerente e impactante da pistas para entrar en esa “locura” cristiana para “hacer cosas buenas por los demás”. Ya tendrá sus críticos y detractores.Noticias llegadas del Congo informan que la Universidad Anglicana en Bunia, inaugurada hace dos años, fue atacada por fuerzas rebeldes el 22 de diciembre que exigieron dinero en efectivo de su presidente Daniel Sabiti Tibafa que sólo pudo recaudar 200 dólares. La universidad tiene 70 alumnos, 11 de ellos se graduarán en teología a principios de 2013.Una polémica mediática se ha generado en Nicaragua cuando el obispo auxiliar de Managua, Silvio Báez, denunció que el Frente Sandinista está dando dinero a sacerdotes e iglesias para “comprarles su lealtad al gobierno”. El presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal, Leopoldo Brenes, respaldó la denuncia de Báez y dijo que ese “apoyo económico” no debe condicionar la libre expresión de la iglesia que está llamada siempre a hablar la verdad. Por otra parte, Samuel Santos, canciller de Nicaragua, dijo a la prensa que las donaciones están destinadas a la reparación de templos y “la promoción de la doctrina de la iglesia”.En un gesto considerado “generoso” el ex presidente de Paraguay, Fernando Lugo, ha aceptado la paternidad de su quinto hijo concebido con una enfermera cuando era obispo católico romano de la diócesis de San Pedro. El niño llamado Ángel, tiene 11 años y las autoridades cambiarán el apellido de su actual padrastro por el de Lugo.Obispos ingleses se oponen a un nuevo proyecto de ley que cambiaría las leyes de la sucesión monárquica del país, permitiendo que el soberano pudiera casarse con una persona “no anglicana”. La ley permitiría también que si el primer vástago de la pareja reinante es hembra ella tuviera derecho al trono, sin tener la corona que esperar el nacimiento de un varón.Refrán Venezolano. Bueno es culantro, pero no tanto. Por Onell A. SotoPosted Jan 14, 2013 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rapidísimas AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

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U.S. Supreme Court refuses to hear Falls Church Anglican case

first_imgU.S. Supreme Court refuses to hear Falls Church Anglican case Action leaves standing state ruling that Episcopal Church, diocese own property Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing March 10, 2014 at 5:19 pm Thank goodness that this chapter is over and that Episcopalians in a Virginia can get on with spreading the good news. It boggles the mind that a group of people can go off and create a new denomination (that is by definition NOT Anglican) based on hatred and exclusion –and at the same time expect that they can keep the property that belongs to the Church from which they’ve chosen to depart. It doesn’t seem like rocket science, trying to figure this one out from a legal point of view. I’m glad the Supreme Court agrees. THE REVD CANON KALE FRANCIS KING Tssf says: Toby McPerson says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Robert R. Hansel says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI walter combs says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 13, 2014 at 1:08 pm Anthony — I am definitely with your notion about not having to agree about non-essentials. In essentials, unity, and in non-essentials, tolerance. Got it. Believe it. That’s not the concern for many people though. Their issue is what is being called negotiable and the ongoing exacting of patience for the private and divisive revelations of notable leaders. Examples: What do you make of a bishop who becomes the president of the regional Planned Parenthood organization and raises his hand to bless the site of an abortion clinic—and tells people that we can all just worship together and not look very closely at such things? Or other bishops who unilaterally changed the definition and practice of marriage in the name of some prophetic insight — well ahead of canonical change which has yet to happen — and then want to worship together and not look closely at such things? …and on – and on…. The exacting of good will and patience for such behavior has become exhausting. March 13, 2014 at 11:54 pm I agree with most if not all of what Doug Despers has written regarding this court case. However I feel the need to respond to some of the comments of Anthony Christiansen. The people who chose to leave TEC did so because they could no longer stay in a denomination that totally went against their interpretation of scripture and Christianity in general. The new church they formed Anthony dismisses as being “based on hatred and exclusion”. Really? Who are you to stand in judgement of these people Anthony? Who appointed you to decide whether they are “true” Anglicans? One of the reasons so many conservative Episcopalians have chosen to leave is because of the self-righteous and polarizing attitudes of people like you! I find it astounding that you can say with a straight face that TEC has embraced the middle way regarding the faith. Let me say that I love the Episcopal church. I love the sacraments, I love the Book of Common Prayer, I love the Anglican form of worship. But let’s be frank – this church is dominated by those with progressive leanings. Completely. Totally. TEC hasn’t embraced the “middle way” in decades. So while all my Episcopal brothers and sisters are celebrating and high-fiving each other over the ultimate outcome of this case, I hope you will pause long enough to say a prayer for those on the losing side and at least wish them well in their spiritual journey. The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Submit a Press Release Ryan Oliver says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 10, 2014 at 8:40 pm This is the result we were hoping for. Sad that it took so long, but what a relief the historic church property will remain in the Episcopal Church. I predict the growth of the congregation to its former strength and with a new sense of mission. How grateful we are for every Episcopalian who remained loyal to our Church. Rector Belleville, IL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 10, 2014 Sharon Caulfield says: Doug Desper says: March 12, 2014 at 9:55 pm Doug, it seems to me to me that part of embracing the via media of Anglicanism involves embracing an understanding and conviction that various parties need not agree in order to live and worship together under the same tent. Such comprehensiveness and inclusivity of difference have been the sine qua nons of Anglicanism from her beginnings. The ancient maxim, “in essentials, unity; in doubtful matters, liberty; in all things, charity,” variously attributed, is a helpful one and is frequently invoked as describing the catholic faith as it should be lived. Many of us believe that TEC has embraced the middle way and the catholic faith more fully as it has attempted to explore and express a still developing tradition and set of doctrines. You may not believe that and that is perfectly fine, but many faithful Episcopalians are of the opinion that it has been those who have chosen to leave that have abandoned the middle way that characterizes our Anglican tradition. Bernard Louis says: Anthony Christiansen says: July 2, 2014 at 9:03 am Viva to the Episcopal Church. Bernard Louis says: Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN March 22, 2014 at 2:31 pm You nailed it with ‘we all lost’. This is hardly a victory. We may have the building and property but hardly have the people to occupy it. Will it just end up sold off and the money used to sue others? Looks like Diocese of Fort Worth is going to prevail against us. The Diocese of South Carolina will probably also go in the ‘win’ column of those who have left us. We need to stop these law suits. So many better ways could the money spent on litigation be used. Terry Francis says: March 11, 2014 at 9:47 am SILLY. The two situations are not even remotely parallel. Anthony Christiansen says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ John Neir says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bernard Louis says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC March 10, 2014 at 7:03 pm Congratulations to the many fine lawyers on behalf of The Episcopal Church who saw this unfortunate chapter to the end. March 17, 2014 at 8:40 pm Also, the fact that TEC has members who call commitment to two thousand years of Catholic faith “hatred and exclusion” only demonstrates how far the TEC has fallen. The absurdity is plain. TEC is has become heretical, training up polarizing adherents committed to exclusivism, and not the via media. Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anthony Christiansen says: March 12, 2014 at 1:01 pm Well, Maybe, Doug. At the same time there are dioceses, untouched by the “let’s secede” syndrome” that continue to put one foot in front of the other, continue to minister beyond their own, continue to grow. West of the Mississippi there are more than one can count. It helps to be aware of those parts of the church well beyond our immediate vision. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal News Service] More than seven years after a majority of clergy and members of several Diocese of Virginia congregations declared they had left the Episcopal Church and the question of ownership of the property involved began to be litigated, the U.S. Supreme Court refused on March 10 to hear the appeal of the last congregation still at odds with the Episcopal Church and the diocese.The court gave no reason for deciding not to review a 2013 ruling by the Virginia Supreme Court reaffirming an earlier circuit court ruling that returned The Falls Church property to loyal Episcopalians to use for the mission of the Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church. The court’s decision was included in its March 10 order list and was one of 121 requests for review that it refused.All that remains in the case is for the Diocese of Virginia to request an order from the Fairfax Circuit Court releasing to the diocese more than $2.6 million that was in the Falls Church’s bank accounts at the time of the split and that the court has been holding in escrow during the progression of the case.“We are most gratified by the Supreme Court’s ruling,” said Diocese of Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston in a press release. “We look forward to the possibilities that the months ahead will bring, and continue to keep those affected by the litigation in our prayers.”In an accompanying letter to the diocese, Johnston called March 10 “an important day for our diocese” because of the ruling.We finally can say, with great thankfulness, that the Diocese of Virginia no longer is involved in property litigation …[and] … The Falls Church Episcopal is free to continue to worship and grow in its home church buildings.”“Although today marks an official and much anticipated end to the litigation, it also marks a beginning,” the bishop said. “We will now be able to focus fully our attentions on the many truly exciting ministries all over our diocese. I pray that those in the [Convocation of Anglicans in North American] congregations will join us in turning this fresh page.”The Rev. John Ohmer, rector of The Falls Church Episcopal, said in the diocesan release that “although it breaks my heart to think of where all that money and energy could have gone, today’s news is uplifting for our congregation.”“My hope and prayer is that all sides can now continue to grow their communities of worship, ministries and outreach in our church homes,” he said.The Falls Church Anglican congregation on Oct. 9, 2013 asked the country’s highest court to review the Virginia Supreme Court’s decision. A chronology of the court filings, including those from other interested parties, which followed from that request is here.The Falls Church was one of 11 congregations in the diocese in which a majority of members voted to disaffiliate from the diocese and the Episcopal Church. Over the years, all but The Falls Church Anglican had settled their property conflicts with the diocese and the church after judicial decisions in favor of the diocese and the church.After a Fairfax County Circuit Court Jjudge ordered The Falls Church Anglican in March 2012 to return the parish property to the diocese, the Anglicans only agreed to allow the Episcopalians to return to the parish building to celebrate Easter (April 8, 2012). However, the Anglican congregation soon thereafter appealed to the state Supreme Court and in the meantime asked the Circuit Court to prevent the Episcopalians from returning again until the high court ruled. The Circuit Court refused and the Falls Church Episcopalians returned to their property on May 15, 2012.The Virginia Supreme Court on April 18, 2013 affirmed the circuit court ruling returning the Falls Church property to the Episcopalians. The Falls Church Anglican asked the state Supreme Court to reconsider, despite earlier comments by the Rev. John Yates, The Falls Church Anglican’s rector, on April 28 that the Supreme Court’s “overwhelming rejection of our arguments … reduces our legal options drastically.”Then in June 2013, the state’s high court refused to reconsider its ruling and Falls Church Anglican later decided to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the state court’s actions.The leaders of the Anglican congregation have not yet commented on the high court’s decision, but in a Feb. 24 update to the members Junior Warden Kristen Short acknowledged that the request for review was “against the odds.” The decision to go to the U.S. Supreme Court, she said, was part of what she called the congregation’s ministry of “speaking boldly on behalf of believing individuals and faithful congregations across the country who are under attack.”“We have tried to discern God’s will at every juncture and believe we are acting out of obedience to Him,” she wrote. “While we may not relish the ‘battle’ we’re in, we did not sense that the Lord was giving us permission to withdraw.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (21) Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 10, 2014 at 4:30 pm Imagine what good work could have been accomplished with all the money wasted on lawyers and litigation. March 10, 2014 at 5:01 pm We give thanks for the ending of this litigation, and for the restoration of loyal Episcopalians to their church buildings and their resources. We are grateful to have this resolved and in the past, and to move on to mission and ministry in the future. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Lucia Lloyd says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. March 11, 2014 at 9:20 am Before all of this destructive engagement I recall how the Falls Church (before the split/conservative departure) was hailed as a vital example of church growth and was bragged about for their comprehensive ministry. Now, I suppose, it helps to just caricature the conservatives as reactionary, narrow, unjust, and any number of qualities that make the remaining Episcopalians more comfortable. But, a failure of “the middle way” has occurred that caricatures and dismissive summaries cannot cover over. How can we be led to believe that so many hundreds and thousands — and nowadays TENS of thousands – of fellow Episcopalians are simply leaving because they listen to a few loud voices and then split off? I don’t think so. I believe that there is a failure of leadership in that the middle way has fallen definitively far left of center and that a new progressive orthodoxy demands strict adherence; much to the damage of the consciences of members; whether they be at Falls Church, South Carolina, New York, Texas, or elsewhere. The liberal progressive orthodoxy often claims to demand respect for canons – such as in property – and yet what of the convenient flouting of other canons to teach our current standard of marriage? The Executive Council joining our Church as a member of the organization advocating abortion rights? The Executive Board’s total failure to take seriously funding and programming for evangelism, as in ignoring the 20/20 mandate from General Convention? Just last year – during Holy Week – Bishop Spong delivered his typical “I doubt that” message about the cross and Christianity in the very diocese that now celebrates the loss of the majority of the membership of the Falls Church. Bishop Spong has never been censured, and he continues to be celebrated and invited to promote a faith rejected by the councils of the Church. I could go on, but to no purpose. The proof is in the pews. This Sunday we cannot muster 1/2 of our membership to support, churches are closing, cathedrals are shuttering, thousands have left. This “victory” is about stuff–but we still have a sentinel event occuring in this denomination that few recognize or have the courage to solve. March 10, 2014 at 4:46 pm I pray that this marks the halt to those who wish to leave the Episcopal Church from filing what are turning out to be irresponsible and expensive lawsuits – who are we leaving behind in our desire to bring Christ and service to the people in this nation and around the world when time after time litigation doomed to fail is destroying resources and ministries?Did not Christ say “And why do you not judge for yourselves what is right? Thus, when you go with your accuser before a magistrate, on the way make an effort to settle the case,* or you may be dragged before the judge, and the judge hand you over to the officer, and the officer throw you in prison. I tell you, you will never get out until you have paid the very last penny.’Some of our best and most capable servants in Christ are paying the very last penny rather than turning to God to find a path so that each party can end these destructive processes and get on with serving the community and the world. Please take our Lord’s words to heart, and serve others, rather than pay that very last penny to the system that is not designed to resolved these issues. March 13, 2014 at 3:43 pm We set up this zero-sum game, where there’s supposed to be winners and losers. But, folks, we all lost. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET March 14, 2014 at 9:22 pm Terry, my “judgement” about who is or is not Anglican is based on something quite fundamental: being Anglican necessarily means being in communion with Canterbury. Those who have broken communion with TEC, The Anglican Church of Canada, etc. are not in communion with Canterbury. Presbyterians and Methodists are also break-offs from the Anglican Communion and I have the utmost respect for many of my Presbyterian and Methodist friends –but that doesn’t mean I have to call them Anglicans. I have no animosity toward those who have left, although I do believe that many of them have left for reasons having to do with hatred and exclusion. I’ve been watching this play out for many years and have had many people tell me their reasons for leaving –and can call those reasons nothing but hatred and exclusion. Do I wish them well? Do I hope some of them decide to return some day? Do I forgive the mistakes that have been made on both sides? I do. And I do pray for those who’ve left. But none of this means that I’m not entitled to have an opinion about all that’s occurred. March 17, 2014 at 8:35 pm Being Anglican does not mean “in communion with Canterbury”. ACNA is in communion with over 70% of the worldwide Anglican communion, many of whom themselves censure and condemn the actions of the TEC and ACC. The shift of centrality in Anglican authority is clearly moving toward GAFCON. Lambeth will remain relevant only inasmuch as Lambeth retains its commitment to the historic Catholic faith. If Canterbury goes the way of TEC and ACC, it will no longer be even a token of authority in the communion. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET March 12, 2014 at 9:48 am Thank you Doug. March 17, 2014 at 8:31 pm Well said, Doug. This division is not over “doubtful matters.” It is over central claims of the historic Christian faith that have been rejected and updated without any adherence to canonical procedure. The via media practiced by progressive Episcopalians is not inclusive, it is far from it. Conservatives are not at all welcome, and are usually pushed to the side or censured. Those who believe otherwise are likely either not exposed to it, or simply persist in disbelief, or are themselves accomplices. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ March 12, 2014 at 10:58 pm Well stated Anthony Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Richard Halter says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Dick Van Gorder says: Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Doug Desper says: Property David Krohne says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

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