Tag: 上海419龙凤

Darwin as Compassionate Buddhist Ape Descendant

first_imgNational Geographic claimed today.  “Darwin the Buddhist?  Empathy Writings Reveal Parallels,” wrote Christine Dell’Amore about new ideas about Darwin by Paul Ekman, psychologist.    What could Darwin possibly have to do with Buddhism?  Ekman told an audience at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago that Charles Darwin was fascinated with facial expressions of emotion.  Indeed, he wrote a book on it: The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals (1872), in which he hired photographers to film faces of people expressing happiness, rage, sadness and other feelings.  Darwin suggested that empathy was a universal trait that had evolved in humans.    Ekman said the idea of universal empathy meshes with Buddhist beliefs about compassion.  Ekman also suggested “it’s also possible that Darwin encountered Buddhist teachings through letters from other scholars of the time.”  To strengthen the Darwin-Buddha connection, Ekman shared an inside story: the Dalai Lama had told him that he “would consider himself a Darwinian.”    Ekman did not explain how this new compassionate Darwin relates to the old picture of evolution as a process of pitiless indifference by a natural world red in tooth and claw.  Nor did he explain why compassion, if genetically inherited in some people and not others, needs to be cultivated – a role seemingly more suitable for religion.  The article simply stated point blank, “Until psychologists figure out why the disparity exists, he said, ‘the survival of our planet’ depends on cultivating compassion.”  This begs the question whether even survival is a good thing in a universe of pitiless indifference.  Nevertheless, the article suggested people could go to “compassion gyms” to improve their empathy fitness.     Somehow, this makes sense to Ekman as he imagines primates becoming more self-aware.  The NG article ended with a quote to this effect by Barbara King, an evolutionary anthropologist at the College of William and Mary in Virginia.  She said, “We wouldn’t be human in the ways we are human today if apes were not deeply emotional creatures and deeply social ones.  We are … products of our past.”    This article reinforces recent attempts to portray a kinder, gentler Darwin, who opposed slavery (see Uncommon Descent).  Some Darwinists, though, don’t appear to have inherited the compassion gene.  In Forbes, Jerry Coyne slammed neurosurgeon Michael Egnor, who had criticized evolution earlier on Forbes, by calling him a charlatan and comparing him to a holocaust denier.  Egnor has had a running rebuttal to Coyne on Evolution News and Views, continuing with part 2 and part 3.OK, Darwin skeptics, charge!  They’re exposing their true colors: Darwinism is a religion.  It may be politically-correct religion, but it’s religion nonetheless.  Is it any wonder we portray Darwin as the Bearded Buddha?  Even the Dalai Lama worships at his shrine.  Caution: don’t offer the prescribed sacrifice!  You will need your brain to understand what is going on: Darwin evolves to fit the rhetorical needs of the Darwin Party propaganda machine.  30 years ago it was the Malthusian, red-claw Darwin of pitiless indifference.  Now it’s the compassionate Buddhist Darwin.  Behind the facade it’s the same Blunderful Wizard of Flaws.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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‘Avian botulism’ reason for bird deaths near Sambhar Lake

first_imgBotulism kills migratory birds at Sambhar lakeVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9Live00:0001:1401:14 The Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI), Bareilly, on Thursday confirmed avian botulism — a neuro-muscular illness caused by a toxin which is produced by a bacterial strain — as the reason for mass mortality of birds, including migratory species from Northern Asia, at Sambhar Lake in Rajasthan.The laboratory tests conducted on the samples of carcasses collected from the lake confirmed the disease infecting the birds, the probability of which was earlier stated by veterinarians in the State. The illness, caused by a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum, affected the nervous system of birds, leading to flaccid paralysis in their legs and wings and neck touching the ground.More than 18,000 carcasses of birds have been removed from the lake and its catchment area so far, raising concern among environmentalists and ornithologists. The scientists at IVRI found the samples infested with maggots of third stage with a clear indication that the avian mortality had occurred over a period of time.Animal Husbandry Minister Lal Chand Kataria said the IVRI report had approved the regimen of treatment adopted for birds recovered from the lake’s shores. “The rescue centres established near the lake have treated 735 birds, of which 368 are alive and 36 have been released to their natural habitat,” he said.Located 80 km south-west of Jaipur, Sambhar Lake is India’s largest inland saline water body and has been designated as a wetland of international importance, attracting thousands of migratory birds during winter.Avian flu ruled outA Bhopal-based laboratory had earlier ruled out avian flu as the cause of deaths of birds after examining the viscera. The post-mortem of two bird carcasses by a Bikaner-based research organisation had concluded that bacterium Clostridium botulinum had entered from the soil into the meat of some dead birds.last_img read more

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Fiba Asia Cup loss of ‘Gilas kuyas’ spurs SEAG-bound PH team on

first_imgLATEST STORIES “We need to rebound for our kuyas (older brothers),” said Kiefer Ravena on Thursday in the Chooks-to-Go-hosted sendoff at Edsa Shangri-la. “It’s a motivation for us to want (the gold) even more and be hungrier.”Gilas assistant coach Jimmy Alapag praised these group for feeling that way, noting that it’s just natural for this team to seek redemption to make up for the loss incurred by their Fiba Asia counterparts.“Of course, if you see your brother and see him fall short of a goal, as the younger brother, I think you wanna go out there and make everyone here at home forget about the loss from last night. The only way you do that and go to the SEA Games and put another great effort and do our best to win a gold medal,” he said.With the Philippines relegated to the classification phase for fifth to eighth place in the Asian championship, the SEA Games roster knows that the pressure is now on them as they eye to win the gold medal for the 18th time.“It’s our turn for redemption,” said Amer. “We have to defend our kuyas. We know the weight they are carrying because all of us are watching them. So with the SEA Games, we know all eyes will now be on us. We just want to help them and protect our fort. All we want when we come home here is that we’re all going to be happy.”ADVERTISEMENT Amer wasn’t only one who went to bed in a gloomy mood as thousands of Filipinos stayed up late only to witness the national team fail to advance past the quarterfinals.What made the defeat tougher to swallow was it came at the hands of its fierce rival Koreans, who continued to own the Philippines’ number in continental tournaments.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Philippines has a chance to avenge that failed bid in Fiba Asia with a strong showing in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games, which will be represented by the younger members of the Gilas Pilipinas pool.And that’s actually one of the the motivations for the SEA Games-bound Gilas crew. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. NCAA Season 93: San Beda ekes out win over Perpetual MOST READ Photo by Mark GiongcoBaser Amer said he had a hard time sleeping after Gilas Pilipinas bowed out of the 2017 Fiba Asia Cup in a humiliating 118-86 defeat to Korea early Thursday morning.“When they got blown out, I struggled to get some sleep,” he shared in Filipino. “I took it really hard because us Filipinos doesn’t want to lose.”ADVERTISEMENT Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s weddingcenter_img LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH PLAY LIST 05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Read Next SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspensionlast_img read more

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9 months agoCrystal Palace boss Hodgson can’t fault players for Watford defeat

first_imgCrystal Palace boss Hodgson can’t fault players for Watford defeatby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace boss Roy Hodgson couldn’t fault his players after defeat to Watford.The Eagles were winning 1-0 at the break thanks to Craig Cathcart’s own goal, but would see that quickly turned around thanks to two goals in seven minutes as Cathcart gained some retribution before a fine volley from Tom Cleverley settled matters in south London.Hodgson said, “It’s tough to lose any game, especially at home and it’s made tougher that we’ve been doing quite well lately. I was hoping that this would be the chance for us to get that elusive third victory that would have lifted us to a much more comfortable place in the table.“We were unable to get it, and when that happens there is no other emotion that I can display other than the obvious one of feeling very sad that we couldn’t do it.”He added: “If you want to win games, then you have to take the chances that come your way. Watford must be comfortable in that respect because they hit the post twice and had one cleared off the line and chances to score their two goals. We perhaps weren’t as effective and only scored one goal, but that’s what football is.“There aren’t many games this year where I have thought we were outplayed or didn’t deserve to win, but there have been games like this where the game could so easily have gone either way and you get questions about regrets or frustrations. I don’t think I could have asked for a lot more from the players; we certainly didn’t lose the game because there wasn’t the desire to win it.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Bloomberg Philanthropies Expands Innovation Teams Program To Seven New Cities Across The

first_imgBloomberg Philanthropies today announced that seven cities across the globe have been selected for the latest expansion of its Innovation Teams program.The program helps City Halls drive bold innovation, change culture, and tackle big problems to deliver better results for residents. Multi-year grants will be awarded to help cities create better results for a range of pressing problems – from tackling poverty and neighborhood revitalization to recruiting and retaining public employees. Cities include Be’er Sheva in Israel; Toronto in Canada, and Anchorage AK; Austin, TX; Baltimore, MD; Detroit, MI; and Durham; NC in the United States.“Mayors must always be looking for new ways to improve the critical services that people depend on,” said Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg Philanthropies and three-term Mayor of New York City. “Our Innovation Teams program helps mayors do that by giving city governments around the world the capacity to make their innovative ideas reality.”Now in the third round of funding, the Innovation Teams program allows mayors to fund in-house innovation teams — or “i-teams” – which investigate complex local challenges, design solutions with clear goals, and rigorously measure progress to better improve citizens’ lives. The newly announced cities join nearly 20 City Halls in the program, including Mobile, AL who is eliminating blight; Minneapolis, MN who is improving the quality of rental housing; and Syracuse, NY who is employing cost-effective measures to respond to aging infrastructure.The seven cities were selected from a pool of municipalities with a demonstrated commitment to designing and delivering bold solutions to complex problems. Eligible cities with at least 100,000 residents and with mayors who have at least two years left in office were invited to apply. Bloomberg Philanthropies’ i-teams expansion deepens the investment in the United States and Israel and, for the first time in the history of the program, introduces the program in Canada.“Bloomberg Philanthropies’ i-teams program has already demonstrated that approach can be successful in cities that range in size, structure, and geographic region,” said Toronto Mayor John Tory. “The City of Toronto is proud to become the first Canadian city to join this impressive network of civic innovators and many of the most innovative City Halls in the world. We look forward to building on our existing strengths and capacities to combat serious issues impacting urban areas around the world.”New Innovation Team cities will receive up to $500,000 annually for up to three years. In addition to the grants, cities receive robust implementation support and opportunities to exchange lessons learned and best practices with peers in other cities. Newly formed i-teams will hit the ground running in each city no later than spring 2017.“Innovation Teams bring 21st century problem-solving skills to City Hall,” said James Anderson, head of Government Innovation programs for Bloomberg Philanthropies. “The teams implement creative solutions by breaking down silos within City Halls, engaging residents to jointly understand citizen needs, and testing ideas before taking them to scale.”The Innovation Teams Program is one of seven Government Innovation offerings at Bloomberg Philanthropies. Government Innovation equips mayors and other city leaders with the tools and techniques they need to solve urban challenges and improve citizens’ lives. I-teams are currently hard at work in Albuquerque, NM; Boston, MA; Centennial, CO; Jersey City, NJ; Long Beach, CA; Los Angeles, CA; Mobile, AL; Minneapolis, MN; Peoria, IL; Seattle, WA; and Syracuse, NY; and Tel Aviv, Israel and Jerusalem, Israel.Key Facts About the Innovation Teams Program:• The i-teams have developed 90 new innovations for their cities – In Mobile, AL, leaders utilized Instagram to geo-locate blighted properties while documenting the impact to residents of more than $83 million in lost market value for properties within 150 feet of a blighted structure • 95% of cities in the program said their i-team has changed the way their city approaches solving complex problems – Los Angeles’ i-team worked with bilingual Angelenos who were facing eviction from their homes to develop solutions that empowered the city’s most vulnerable communities • 100% of cities in the program believe their i-team created solutions that will improve quality of life for local residents – Minneapolis is currently institutionalizing a pilot that helps improve the quality of privately held rental housing in North Minneapolis • To date, the i-team cities have secured $70 million in additional public and private sector matching funds to advance their work – Tel Aviv has secured private funding to support the team’s mapping initiative, which involves identifying new spaces around the city—including government buildings and other public spaces—that could be opened up as childcare spacelast_img read more

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Fort St John getting over 400k from Province for multiuse path on

first_imgThe eighteen projects across the province will be getting a total of $6.11 million from BikeBC this year. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The provincial government has announced that Fort St. John is one of eighteen communities across B.C. getting funding for cycling projects.The City will be getting $433,736 in funding for a multi-use path along 93rd Ave. from BikeBC, the Province’s cost-sharing program that helps communities build cycling projects. Earlier this year, the Province announced enhancements to BikeBC, to better support rural communities, and offer more flexibility in the kinds of projects eligible for funding.“B.C. is a leader in North America when it comes to cycling infrastructure, and I’m pleased to see 18 more communities building a culture of cycling and encouraging healthy living,” said Claire Trevena, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. “I’m excited this year’s grant recipients represent diversity in the kinds of projects being built and the size of participating communities – both urban and rural.”last_img read more

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Joni Crenshaw Becomes 2nd Georgia Womens Basketball Coach in

Joni Henderson became only the second head coach in Georgia women’s basketball history, replacing Andy Landers, who led the program to prominence in his 36 years.Henderson, who was recruited by Landers but signed with Alabama, joined the Bulldog staff as an assistant four years ago. She spoke of her opportunity to SB Nation’s Swish Appeal.Question: What were your feelings when you were told you would be the next head coach at Georgia?Crenshaw: “Pretty overwhelmed. I was speechless. . .Your head starts spinning because you know the process goes pretty quickly. I started thinking I need to call my mom, my dad, my fiancé (USC assistant Darius Taylor), I need to have a team meeting. So immediately, you’re listening to them, but you’re also thinking about all these other things that you’ve kind of had in your mind, but you don’t really want to take yourself there until you know for sure.”Q: How did the players react when they found out you were going to be their next coach?JC: “It was excitement all the way around, and honestly that’s a great feeling to know that you have their support. They were so good during the transition period, just doing everything we asked of them and really moving business as normal in terms of academics, on the floor workouts, and in the weight room. When you see their reaction it just makes it all the more worthwhile.”Q: How do you feel learning under (Andy Landers’) stewardship and knowing that he is a big believer in you?JC: “I have had an opportunity that a lot of people don’t get, and I recognize that. I tried every day working with him and for him not to let him down. My biggest thing is, I don’t want to disappoint. I have been like that since I was a kid, I never wanted to disappoint my parents, my teachers, my friends. . . That really drives me and fuels me.”Q: How do you feel that you are going to put your stamp on Georgia women’s basketball?JC: “I think I’m a no-nonsense person, I think I am a player’s coach and that they can relate to me, I think I am a role-model for them. The first thing you have to have is credibility and I’ve played in the SEC at a high level, I’ve been in this conference for several years and I’ve coached for 13. So I have the credibility, but after that you have to earn their trust. Once you do those two things, the rest kind of falls in place.”Q: Have you given any thought to the fact that you are now only the second full-time head coach in the school’s history? What does that mean to you?JC: “Yes and no. Obviously I know that, and there’s times where I’m like, ‘wow,’ but there’s times where it doesn’t faze me. I have been going on autopilot and adrenaline since the announcement. I was completely aware of it before though, realizing whoever was named would be only the second full-time coach in Georgia history, it’s incredible. I think it really just speaks to what Coach Landers has done not only in the community, but for Georgia as well.”Q: What is your vision for Georgia women’s basketball going forward?JC: “To put a good product on the floor. To have kids who represent themselves, their families, this university, and their communities. To have first-class players not only on the floor, but in the classroom and the community. We want to be visible and accessible to the public and our fans. We want to play hard.” read more

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Pino anchoring Columbus Clippers nohit brigade

Columbus Clippers pitcher Yohan Pino has proven to be the prospect that the Cleveland Indians had been looking for when they acquired him in a trade from the Minnesota Twins in exchange for Carl Pavano.After a win on Sunday, Pino has a team-best 4-0 record this season. He leads the team in strikeouts with 28, and has a 3.68 ERA.Pino began pitching in the Indians’ farm system in September 2009. He has pitched in five games, earning a 6-0 record with the Clippers.Pino features a fastball in the 90 mph range, a curveball that drops down to the mid-70 mph range and a changeup.In a win last Tuesday against the Charlotte Knights, Pino overcame a rough first inning to quiet the Knights’ bats and collect his third win of the season.Jason Donald, second baseman for the Clippers, was pleased with Pino’s performance against the Knights.“Innings like that happen,” Donald said. “He hasn’t had any innings like that in 2010. The whole year, he has kept us in ball games. He’s done a great job, and he’s a guy that deserves the run support that he received tonight. He’ll be the first to tell you that he didn’t have his best stuff tonight, but it was good enough to get through five innings and get to the bullpen to finish it up for us.”Pino had four appearances with the Cleveland Indians during spring training. He had a 1-0 record with a 4.22 ERA, striking out nine batters in 10.2 innings pitched.Pino is still a young prospect at age 26.“If you look at our rotation, there are a lot of young arms including Carlos Carrasco, Hector Rondon, Jeanmar Gomez and Yohan Pino,” Clippers manager Mike Sarbaugh said. “We’ve got some really good-looking young arms in the starting rotation and in the bullpen.”Pino has been impressive since he stepped into the starting rotation with the Class AA New Britain Rock Cats in 2009.Pino has made 18 straight starts without missing an outing with the Rock Cats, Rochester Red Wings and Clippers.In those 18 starts, Pino has a 10-2 record with 100 strikeouts.Pino is one of the Clippers’ three starting pitchers that have pitched a no-hitter. Pino tossed his no-hitter on June 30, 2007, while pitching for the Fort Myers Miracle. Carrasco threw a no-hitter on Aug. 13, 2007 for the Reading Phillies, and Gomez threw a perfect game on May 21, 2009 for the Akron Aeros. read more

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Gentle giant keeps growing Clark Kellogg continues to make impact on game

It happened before his second season in the NBA. The cartilage around Clark Kellogg’s knee began to wear away, leading to the first of three surgeries in four years. In August 1987, Kellogg announced he was retiring from the NBA. His career lasted five years, the last two shortened by knee injuries. At the promising age of 26, his dream was ending, a career vanishing in the wind. “I was disheartened and disappointed at the time that my basketball-playing days were over,” Kellogg said in an interview with The Lantern. Kellogg’s wife Rosy had to witness her husband go through one knee surgery after another. Then she watched as her husband lost a career. “It was difficult because it was something that he truly loved,” Rosy said. Former President of South Africa Nelson Mandela once wrote, “The greatest glory in living lies not in never failing, but in rising every time we fail.” Kellogg’s uncompromising knees forced him to fall, but he refused to stay down for long. Kellogg was born and raised in Cleveland by his father, Clark, and his mother, Mattie. His father was a police officer, and his mom worked part-time at a local hospital. Although he played a number of sports as a child, Kellogg determined his favorite at a young age. “I loved all sports, but I really kind of locked into hoops when I was about 11,” Kellogg said. “And that became my real passion, that’s what I enjoyed doing more than anything else.” After growing up in a predominantly black neighborhood, Kellogg was advised by his elementary school principal to attend St. Joe’s (now known as Villa Angela-St. Joseph), an “all-white high school.” While it was challenging at times, he is grateful for the guidance he received at the school. “It was good because it broadened my horizons,” Kellogg said. “It prepared me for college and in many ways prepared me for the life I’m enjoying right now.” Special K, as he was nicknamed in high school, was a highly touted recruit coming out of St. Joe’s. During his final high school game in 1979, he dropped an Ohio high school tournament-record 51 points on Columbus East. The record still stands 31 years later. With his high school career coming to a close, Kellogg had to make an important choice: Which college would he be playing for by the end of the year? “I really wanted to stay fairly close to Cleveland. I wanted my parents to be able to come to my games,” Kellogg said. “It came down to Ohio State and Michigan. And then Ohio — the whole state — kind of recruited me. People are really passionate and rabid about the Ohio State athletic teams in particular, so being recruited by the whole state was hard to turn down.” Kellogg played for three years at OSU, averaging a double-double with 14.9 points and 10.1 rebounds per game. Yet, his most significant moment in college happened away from the basketball court. “We met at a concert when Clark was a freshman at Ohio State in 1979 and we’ve been married for 27 years this past July,” Rosy said. After what was considered a disappointing year for the team by the Buckeye faithful, Kellogg left after his junior year to pursue his dream of playing professional basketball. He was selected eighth overall by the Indiana Pacers in the 1982 NBA Draft. In his rookie year, Kellogg again averaged a double-double, scoring 20.1 points and hauling in 10.6 rebounds per game. He was named to the All-Rookie team and finished second in the Rookie of the Year race. After a knee operation and two more years of solid basketball, Kellogg had a second knee operation. He played in only 19 games in his fourth season and would play in only four more before his career came to an abrupt end. With his playing days in the past, Clark began a new career as a basketball commentator. He broadcast Pacers games on the radio and did the same for Cleveland State University games on its television network. A few years later, while providing analysis for Atlantic Ten regional games, Dick Vitale put him on ESPN’s radar. “He had covered me as a player and knew I was doing some broadcasting, so he recommended me to the network,” Kellogg said. While working for ESPN, Kellogg was blinded by another unimaginable loss. His mother passed away in 1994 because complications that arose during surgery. In the face of adversity for a second time, he beat it back with a broom. In 1997, he left ESPN and joined CBS as a full-time studio/game analyst. But not before settling some unfinished business. When Kellogg left OSU in 1982, he was 44 hours away from obtaining a degree. In 1996, he graduated from OSU. He likes to joke that he was on the “circuitous 17-year plan.” In 2008, Kellogg was named the lead college basketball analyst for CBS Sports, replacing Billy Packer. “He has a really good handle on what takes place on the court and he uses terminology that really grabs the viewer,” said Harold Bryant, executive producer and vice president of production for CBS Sports. “We discussed (promoting him) and we felt like he had earned the spot.” Being the leading college basketball analyst for a major television network would satisfy most, but Kellogg continues to take advantage of other opportunities. In July 2010, the Indiana Pacers named Kellogg vice president of player relations. Kellogg’s new role on the team is to be a mentor of sorts to the players on the Pacers roster, nine of which are 26 years old or younger. “Because I’ve been on the court, I can speak about some areas of basketball development to our guys personally,” Kellogg said. “But primarily it’s a position of … guiding our guys with programs and services so that they can be champions on and off the court.” Kellogg’s responsibilities don’t end there. He’s also one of the play-by-play announcers for the NBA 2K video game franchise. In June 2010, Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland announced that Kellogg was being appointed to OSU’s Board of Trustees. Before the appointment, he served for five years on the board of directors for the Alumni Association. “It’s an exciting honor. I try to stay engaged in the university since I’m here in Columbus,” Kellogg said. “I try to keep abreast of all OSU athletics. I’m Scarlet and Gray through and through.” In April, CBS organized a game of horse between Kellogg and President Barack Obama. When the president beat him five letters to three, some viewers thought Kellogg threw the game. “I didn’t actually throw it,” Kellogg said. “I was up pretty comfortably, the president was struggling and I was knocking down everything.” “So I created a situation where I wouldn’t close things out as quickly as I possibly could have,” Kellogg said. “When I did that, he found his legs and momentum and beat me to the finish line.” Kellogg went on to show some respect for our nation’s leader, all the while revealing a stinging truth. “He’s got a pretty nice-looking shot,” Kellogg said. “And he also doesn’t lack in the trash-talking department either.” Kellogg resides in Westerville with his wife and three children, a daughter and two sons, both of whom play basketball at Ohio University. Lloyd Brewton, one of Clark’s local golfing buddies, had only positive things to say about the man who routinely “takes his money” on the golf course. “He’s the kind of guy who, if he says he’s going to do something, he’s going to do it,” Brewton said. “Clark is a man who is bounded by his faith and bounded by his commitment to friendship.” His wife, realizing that she could sound biased given that they’re married, was also quick to dole out the praise. “He’s honest, caring, loyal and a good listener,” Rosy said. “I feel like he’s a gentle giant.” At 6-feet-7-inches, referring to Kellogg as a giant isn’t too far off base. Perhaps it’s only fitting that his career trajectory continues to grow. read more

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Griezmann Ramos is my little friend

first_imgAntoine Griezmann made a friendly jibe at Real Madrid defender Sergio Ramos after the Spanish skipper questioned his ambition publicly.The Real Madrid captain urged Diego Simeone to teach Griezmann some “values” following his claims as one of the best footballers in the World.Griezmann and Ramos later traded tackles in the Madrid derby that ended in a draw at the Santiago Bernabeu.Asked about Ramos afterward, Griezmann said: “He’s my little friend, I have a lot of respect for him.David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“He’s an example for the kids and a great centre-back.“For me, this is a game; I like to have fun with my team-mates and with players from other teams.“Sometimes I’m ‘poking,’ and this time I was ‘poked.’”Ramos equally shared his thoughts about Griezmann following the clash and the Spain international told Goal.com: “I have not spoken with Griezmann, regardless of the opinion of each other, one must always have the utmost respect for a fellow professional.”last_img read more

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