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#JaVotes2016: JLP supporters injured in car crash

first_img The accident took place along the 10 Miles Main Road, Bull Bay. The route 97 JUTC bus was headed to 11 Miles, Bull Bay, with the car heading in the opposite direction. According to Detective Inspector Neville Graham of the St Thomas police division, the driver and his lone passenger suffered what he deemed to be minor injuries. Blood, however, could be seen on the side of the roadway which onlookers said were that of the victims. The driver of the JUTC bus was unharmed. Two Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) supporters had to be rushed to the Kingston Public Hospital after the car they were travelling in collided with a Jamaica Urban Transit Company (JUTC) bus.last_img read more

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Running is in her blood

first_imgRunning in tough conditions, Budd-Pieterse completed her longest race distance so far, the Two Oceans Marathon. Budd-Pieterse has enjoyed success onthe senior circuit in the US, where shecurrently lives.(Images: The Unlimited) Early in the morning of 3 June, she’llset off on her first Comrades Marathon,sharing the road with thousands of other runners.(Image: Comrades Marathon) MEDIA CONTACTS • Terez Taylor  PR, The Unlimited  +27 31 716 9665 or +27 83 273 3015 RELATED ARTICLES • Running into the history books • Getting Africa’s youngsters moving • Mutola’s girl Caster off to London • Living on in the Comrades spirit • How’s your Friday looking?Janine ErasmusZola Budd-Pieterse is no longer the naïve young darling of South African athletics, but the 46-year-old still has what it takes. She finished her first ultramarathon in April 2012, running a cold and rainy Two Oceans in Cape Town in under 4 and a half hours.At 56km, the Two Oceans was the longest race Budd-Pieterse had run in her entire career.“If you can do this race in these conditions, you’ve really accomplished something,” she said afterwards.With a successful first shot at the 50km Loskop Marathon also under her belt, the petite athlete  tackled the daunting Comrades Marathon – at around 90km, one of the world’s toughest races – in June, and finished in a respectable time.Her sponsor for these events is insurance and financial services provider The Unlimited, which runs a comprehensive wellness programme for its employees.Running into the record booksBudd-Pieterse, a 5 000m specialist, set many running records in the 1980s. She broke the world record in this event in 1983 and 1985, running in her famous barefoot style which, she has said, only applied to grass and track events. On the road she always wore shoes.Her popularity was such that even today her name is used informally to describe minibus taxis, and the late singer Brenda Fassie had a big hit with her single “Zola Budd”, an ode to the super-fast township taxi which took you anywhere you wanted to go.In 1984 Budd-Pieterse was granted British citizenship through her grandfather, in order to compete in that year’s Olympic Games in Los Angeles, as her home country was banned from all international competition because of its apartheid policies. She was just 18 years old at the time.Running in front of a hostile crowd in the women’s 3 000m final, she collided with the American Mary Decker, who fell and was unable to finish. Budd-Pieterse came in seventh and in her 1989 autobiography admitted that she deliberately slowed down to avoid the possibility of having to collect a medal to the noise of boos and jeers.An inquiry afterwards found her not guilty of causing the incident and years later, Decker attributed it to the fact that she, Decker, was inexperienced in running in tight groups.Never far away from AfricaAlthough she won the world cross country championships in 1985 and 1986, representing her adopted country, Budd-Pieterse’s UK career didn’t last much longer and she came back to South Africa in 1988.She announced her retirement from international competition shortly afterwards, but returned to the track to represent South Africa at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics – the country’s first Summer Games since its banishment in 1960.Currently she and her family live in California, where she has competed successfully in the senior racing circuit since 2008. Although the drive to compete and achieve is still there, she said in a 2008 interview with the New York Times, it’s not as all-encompassing at it used to be, and now she runs for enjoyment and not because there are records to be broken.Even in the few years since her relocation, she said, the demographics of running in South Africa have changed.“There are a lot more women running, which I am very thankful for, so yes there is an upliftment in running. You can see it in the figures that ran Two Oceans; there were more women running, which I am very proud of.”The family plans to return to South Africa as soon as possible.“We moved to the US about four years ago, only to live there temporarily for two years and then it went on for four years,” she said. “Our business is still in South Africa and our home and everything, so South Africa is still our home. It depends on my kids, when they finish high school, and when we are going to move back.”It’s not IF, asserted Budd-Pieterse – It’s more a question of WHEN.Asked how she’d react if one of her own children developed Olympic ambitions, she said straight away that she wouldn’t volunteer to be the coach.“My first advice would be to get a good coach for my kid,” she laughed. “I would be really proud of them but first of all I would make sure it’s something they really want to do and they are passionate about, and that’s more important for me than anything else. And then I would support them as much as possible.”And there’s no question of where the allegiance would lie – “We are all still South Africans, definitely.”Tackling new challengesThe feisty mother of three is far from done with her running career. On 7 April 2012 she completed the Two Oceans in unfavourable weather in a time of four hours, 29 minutes and 51 seconds, and successfully completed her first Comrades.This year on 3 June the entrants took on the 89km down run from Pietermaritzburg to Durban, the final third of which is said to be tougher than any other stage, whether up or down.Her preparations were helped along by none other than nine-time Comrades winner Bruce Fordyce, who was present in the stadium to witness that doomed 1984 Olympic final. Fordyce said in a newspaper column before the race that he felt Budd-Pieterse was quite capable of getting a silver medal by coming in between six hours and seven hours 30 minutes.But she didn’t set herself any unrealistic target for the big race, and said she’d be happy if she finishes in a time of around eight hours. She was almost right on the mark with her final time of eight hours, six minutes and nine seconds although it was, she said later, the hardest race of her life.“Although my preparations for the race have gone smoothly, I am a bit concerned because I did not do enough mileage, as I hear other people have done,” she said beforehand, “but for what I want to achieve I think it was good enough. Bruce has really been great, advising me when to do my hard runs, how to taper and all of that.”Budd-Pieterse has also secured the agency for Newton athletics gear and running shoes in South Africa. Operating out of her home city of Bloemfontein, she’s busily promoting the gear, the running shoes of which are said to be almost as good as running barefoot.last_img read more

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Photo: Sebastian The Ibis Is Wearing A Suit To Miami’s Nightclub Uniform Release Party

first_imgMiami players run onto the field before a game.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – NOVEMBER 11: The Miami Hurricanes take the field during a game against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Hard Rock Stadium on November 11, 2017 in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)We’re less than two hours from Miami’s adidas uniform release party at Club Liv in Miami Beach. It looks like those in attendance are dressed for the occasion, including Miami’s mascot, Sebastian the Ibis. Sebastian is donning a suit for the occasion.Sebastian The Ibis is ready for the Adidas jersey reveal party at Club Liv pic.twitter.com/I2MLM6wnK1— CaneSport (@CaneSport) July 18, 2015Looking sharp, Sebastian. Check back later tonight for the full scoop on Miami’s uniform reveal.last_img read more

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Its the right time Humboldt Broncos president steps down from executive

first_imgHUMBOLDT, Sask. – The man who became the public face of the Humboldt Broncos in the days after the Saskatchewan junior hockey team’s bus crashed in April has stepped down as president of the organization.Kevin Garinger told a club board meeting on Tuesday he will not be seeking re-election to the top post.Garinger said he wants to devote more time to his family, to his job as CEO and director of education with Saskatchewan’s Horizon School Division and to a doctorate he’s pursuing in educational leadership.“It’s been a decision that’s not been taken lightly. I feel it’s the right time for somebody else to be able to take over and continue to move this organization forward,” he said in an interview with The Canadian Press.Now into the third year of a three-year term on the board, Garinger is to provide support and guidance for new president Jamie Brockman.Garinger said he took on the presidency last year when no one else wanted the job.Brockman, who served as president between 2012 and 2017, said in a news release Wednesday that he did not intend to take the job again, but he wants to ensure the team continues to be strong.“I have a lot of confidence in our current board of directors because these people also want to help, so I feel I have a great support network and look forward to moving the team forward,” Brockman said.He acknowledged the previous executive and the directors who have left since the crash.“Their lives were also turned upside down and I am thankful for the work they did.”Garinger teared up when asked how much of an effect the April 6 fatal collision had on his decision to not seek re-election. He said no one ever expected anything like that to happen and he indicated he needs counselling to help him deal with the tragedy.“In stepping back like this … to make sure that I can look after myself before I look after others. That’s something I need to do for my family. I’m in that place where I’m wanting to pursue the supports that are necessary for myself.”The Broncos board also named Maury Simoneau as vice-president, Curtis Wacker as treasurer and Lee Dufort as secretary.Sixteen people were killed and 13 others were injured when the hockey team’s bus and a transport truck collided at a highway intersection northeast of Saskatoon.The Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League club was on its way to a playoff game when the crash happened.Two of the players who survived remain in hospital while a third player who was left paralyzed, Ryan Straschnitzki, is pursuing sledge hockey with an eye to making the national team and competing at the Winter Paralympic Games.Garinger said all the survivors are an inspiration.“There are 13 young men who are with us. We are grateful for that. It’s an amazing feeling to know they’re continuing to progress and heal, in spite of very difficult circumstances.”RCMP have said they will not release any details of the investigation into the crash or what they believe happened.Jaskirat Singh Sidhu, 29, of Calgary faces 16 counts of dangerous driving causing death and 13 counts of dangerous driving causing bodily injury.He remains free on bail. His case is to be back in court Oct. 2 in Melfort, Sask.— By Ken Trimble of The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Halifax author Kris Bertin wins 10000 Danuta Gleed Literary Award

first_imgRunner-up prizes of $500 apiece were awarded to Kerry Lee Powell for “Willem de Kooning’s Paintbrush (HarperCollins) and Laura Trunkey for “Double Dutch” (Astoria). VANCOUVER — Halifax writer Kris Bertin has won the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. Login/Register With: Advertisement “Bertin knows place and he knows language and he knows his characters — the garbage collectors, the overweight landlords, the Bertin offers an introduction to the individuals at the moment before everything within their world changes — for better or for worse. Now in its 20th year, the Danuta Gleed Award recognizes the best first collection of short fiction by a Canadian author published in English. The prize was named for the late Danuta Gleed, whose short fiction won several awards before her death in December 1996. Advertisement Advertisement Twittercenter_img They said the stories in “Bad Things Happen” “come at you like the rounds of a heavyweight match.” This year’s prize jury included authors Caroline Adderson, Judy Fong Bates and David Bergen. Facebook Bertin was awarded the $10,000 grand prize for his debut “Bad Things Happen” (Biblioasis) at the OnWords Conference in Vancouver on Saturday night. “They are tough and bloodied and pure. And yet, beneath the surface there is revealed a surprising softness, as when a mother gathers her damaged adult son to her chest and says, ‘It’s alright, and it’s all over,’” the jury wrote in its citation. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Lyse Champagne for “The Light that Remains” (Enfield & Wizenty) and Andre Narbonne for “Twelve Miles to Midnight” (Black Moss Press) were the other finalists. The short-story collection centres around a variety of characters — professors, janitors, webcam models, small-time criminals — in between pivotal stages of their lives.last_img read more

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Heavy secrecy surrounds hearing into possible lawyer misconduct

first_imgBy Kathleen MartensAPTN National NewsVANCOUVER —Another serious breach within the residential schools settlement process could be resolved sooner rather than later.That’s because the judge hearing the case Wednesday told the parties to try and work things out on their own.Justice Brenda Brown of the Vancouver Supreme Court took this unusual step at the beginning of a three-day hearing into allegations of extortion involving a convicted killer and the Vancouver lawyer who allegedly hired him.This is an “excellent opportunity for the parties to discuss what can be done,” Brown told Lou Zivot, the lawyer for the court monitor that oversees the compensation process. “I think this is the time to try.”Court was adjourned till the afternoon when the parties were asked to report back on their progress.The last time a violation emerged involving a lawyer and the compensation process was November 2011. Brown ordered an extensive investigation that took many months and wound up costing an estimated $3.5 million.Brown cited the timing and cost of another investigation in sending Zivot and Mark Andrews, who represents the lawyer involved this time, to try and reach a resolution.The murderer has been identified as Ivan Johnny, 62. But the lawyer’s name and evidence connected to the case are protected by a court order.“We’ve made some progress,” Zivot told Brown when court reconvened in the afternoon. He then asked for more time to meet with Andrews.Brown said, “Alright. Sounds good to me. As long as you’re making progress.”APTN Investigates obtained parole documents, which are not covered by the publication ban, to learn more about the case.The documents reveal Johnny’s full parole was revoked Jan. 23 after two members of a parole board heard the new allegations against him: that Johnny worked for a lawyer distributing and collecting compensation application forms from former residential school students, that he persuaded some students to drop their existing lawyers in favour of the one he worked for, that he coached them to exaggerate claims to obtain more financial compensation, and that he threatened and intimidated them for “substantial sums of money” when their compensation arrived.Johnny denies the accusations and has not been charged with a crime in connection with the case. He did confirm, however, that the lawyer bought him a truck to do his work. Parole documents also say Johnny was involved with 275 claims.The compensation is paid through a program called the Independent Assessment Process. It is money for former students who suffered serious physical and sexual abuse in the notorious schools they were forced to attend when they were children.Johnny’s alleged victims are described as “vulnerable” and, in some cases, “cognitively deficient” in the parole documents.The IAP was established as part of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. It ran for five years, expiring in September 2012. Due to the complicated and historic nature of the claims, many of them take up to nine months, and are still working their way through the process.The lawyer involved spoke to APTN outside court today but declined to say anything on the record at this time.Other parties at the hearing also declined to comment publicly citing the strict publication ban and the sensitive nature of potential resolution discussions; they are all parties to the original settlement agreement, and include the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat.The Secretariat has posted a warning about Johnny on its website. It says Johnny has now been kicked out of the IAP (by Justice Brown on Jan. 18) and that anyone who dealt with Johnny doesn’t have to pay him or anyone trying to collect on his behalf.Johnny was serving a life sentence for first-degree murder from May 1985, after shooting a man he fought with in a Kamloops bar.Meanwhile, one notable absence before the judge yesterday was the Assembly of First Nations. It is a key party to the settlement agreement, having filed the original class-action lawsuit on behalf of survivors.Any steps taken to deal with breaches must be approved by all the parties to the agreement.kmartens@aptn.calast_img read more

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Newcomers bring decaying Kentucky distillery back to life

first_imgMILLVILLE, Ky. – The whiskey quit flowing decades ago from a landmark Kentucky distillery housed in a picturesque castle. Nearly a half-century of neglect reduced the one-time tourist draw to a decaying relic.Now, two newcomers to the whiskey business have resurrected the Old Taylor distillery and renamed it. And along with bourbon and rye, they hope once again to generate tourism.Will Arvin and Wes Murry saw potential where others perceived only blight. In the past four years they’ve spent millions to restore the old glory of the castle-like entrance, sunken garden and colonnaded springhouse.“The spirit of the place really called to us,” Arvin said. “The bones of the building were solid. And we could just see through the decay and the brush to know that this place really needed to be brought back and saved as an iconic place.”Renamed Castle & Key Distillery, the facility resumed spirits production in late 2016 — the first year whiskey was produced there since the distillery shuttered in 1972.On Wednesday, the grounds reopened to visitors.Arvin and Murry are following in the footsteps of the distillery’s founder, Col. E.H. Taylor. A bourbon giant of his time, he built the Old Taylor distillery in the late 1880s and made it a forerunner of today’s bourbon tourism business. Ownership eventually passed to National Distillers, and production ended during a lean time for bourbon producers.Now bourbon sales are booming again, and the new owners are preparing bourbon and rye whiskey to hit the market under the Castle & Key label. The brown spirits are still maturing in barrels nestled in the distillery’s warehouses. Master distiller Marianne Eaves hopes rye can make its debut in about a year, and says the brand’s bourbon could be ready in 2021.“We’re letting flavour drive the decision on the release date,” she said.Murry said they hope to turn a marginal profit within a couple of years. In the meantime, the owners have found other ways to generate income. The brand’s vodka and gin reached store shelves in April. The distillery also produces bourbon and rye on contract for several corporate customers.Tourism should help the bottom line, especially if the iconic facility joins the Kentucky Bourbon Trail.Kentucky Distillers’ Association President Eric Gregory is among those predicting tourism success for Castle & Key. The central Kentucky distillery between Frankfort and Versailles sits a few miles from the Woodford Reserve and Buffalo Trace distilleries.“It will be one of the most visited bourbon tourism sites in Kentucky — quickly,” Gregory said.Bill Samuels Jr., who retired after a long career as top executive at Maker’s Mark, remembers admiring the castle-like distillery on a boyhood trip with his father. As years passed and the decay took its toll, he wondered if it would ever return. Twenty-five years ago, there was exciting talk of a restoration — but it came to nothing. Finally, he said, “we just gave up, thinking this will never happen.”Enter Arvin and Murry. Looking to become a distillery owner and tap into bourbon’s resurgence, Arvin discovered the Old Taylor site on the internet. A mutual friend connected him with Murry, 40, who was looking for an entrepreneurial venture.They paid about $950,000 for the distillery in 2014. Restoring it took longer and cost more than expected, and it meant career changes. Arvin, 51, left a law career behind; Murry worked in finance.The enormity of the renovation would have driven many to drink. Most of the windows were boarded up. One storage warehouse had collapsed. Roofs were failing. The grounds were a jungle of weeds.“You only walked where animals had beaten a path,” Murry said. “That was how you got around.”Gregory, who trudged through the thicket with Arvin during an early visit, said, “You were expecting some ghost at any moment … because it was just so overgrown and so abandoned.”Eaves, 31, was a rising star during her time at Brown-Forman Corp., whose products include Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve bourbon. She was drawn by the Old Taylor site and the new owners’ ambitious plans to revive it. Creating the Castle & Key spirits lineup as master distiller seemed a “once in a lifetime opportunity” when she signed on in early 2015. Soon, though, the size of the challenge became apparent — and that was long before whiskey was mentioned as a tariff target in an international trade war.“We didn’t have any heat, no running water, no restrooms,” she said. “It was a stark change from working at a very comfortable corporate job to coming to this start-up environment.”Now, the distillery hums with activity seven days a week. The workforce is 60 and growing. The grounds are manicured, thanks to renowned Kentucky landscaper Jon Carloftis, and a quarter-mile botanical walking trail beckons.Gregory said the hidden treasures among Kentucky’s abandoned distilleries “are getting very few and far between.” But as Castle & Key achieves more milestones, he thinks some of the prospective buyers who passed up the chance might regret their decision.“They’re probably kicking themselves already,” he said.last_img read more

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Fort St John getting over 400k from Province for multiuse path on

first_imgThe eighteen projects across the province will be getting a total of $6.11 million from BikeBC this year. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The provincial government has announced that Fort St. John is one of eighteen communities across B.C. getting funding for cycling projects.The City will be getting $433,736 in funding for a multi-use path along 93rd Ave. from BikeBC, the Province’s cost-sharing program that helps communities build cycling projects. Earlier this year, the Province announced enhancements to BikeBC, to better support rural communities, and offer more flexibility in the kinds of projects eligible for funding.“B.C. is a leader in North America when it comes to cycling infrastructure, and I’m pleased to see 18 more communities building a culture of cycling and encouraging healthy living,” said Claire Trevena, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. “I’m excited this year’s grant recipients represent diversity in the kinds of projects being built and the size of participating communities – both urban and rural.”last_img read more

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Western Alberta District RCMP Rural Crime Reduction Unit charge armed robbery suspects

first_imgLater in the day, the RCMP had located the vehicle in Grande Prairie and arrested the two occupants within the vehicle at a gas station on the east side of the city.According to Police, the pair were arrested in a stolen vehicle and a quantity of stolen property was located inside the vehicle.Facing charges are 31-year-old Michael Robert Corris and 56-year-old Joseph William Kelly, both of Fort St. John.Both males have been remanded in custody and will appear in Grande Prairie Provincial Court on September 26, 2019. GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – The Western Alberta District RCMP Rural Crime Reduction Unit has charged suspects in connection to an armed robbery in Pouce Coupe.During the early morning hours of August 7, at around 5:00 a.m., Dawson Creek RCMP received a report of an armed robbery at a local business in the Pouce Coupe area.The RCMP say a description of the suspect vehicle was obtained and shared with RCMP Detachments in the Peace Region.last_img read more

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