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Save the date – Paul Jenkins speaks at Brock

Mark your calendar for Thursday, Nov. 4.  Former senior deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, Paul Jenkins, will be visiting the Brock campus to speak. He will attend a reception for graduates and friends of the Faculty of Business to be held that evening. Jenkins is a St. Catharines native and a Brock chapter Beta Gamma Sigma honoree. Time, location and speech topic to follow, but be sure to save the date.

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Human trafficking fastest growing form of organized crime UN anticrime chief

“I am not referring to the smuggling of migrants but to the modern form of human slavery where the victim loses the freedom to control his or her own life,” Pino Arlacchi, the Executive Director of the Vienna-based UN Drug Control and Crime Prevention Programme (UNDCP), said today in an address to the Permanent Council of the Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe (OSCE).”There are reports that drug traffickers are switching to human cargo to obtain greater profit with less risk,” he said. After noting several examples from around the world of thousands of persons – particularly women and children – taken against their will each year and forced into slavery or prostitution, Mr. Arlacchi said both organizations needed to be more proactive in implementing their common policy against trafficking in human beings. “This means helping our Member States introduce or upgrade their legislation,” he said. “It means assistance in the training of prosecutors and police. It means educating the public to the true nature of this form of crime.” Mr. Arlacchi said that as multilateral organizations, the UN and the OSCE could be especially effective in addressing the urgent need for operational cooperation along the whole chain – source countries, transit countries and destination countries. “The OSCE already has initiatives of this nature, and the UN can work closely with those initiatives in trying to move forward on a global level,” he said, calling for countries to ratify the International Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which received a record number of signatures last December in Palermo, Italy. read more

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1000 mourners flock to funeral of UN health agency chief Lee Jongwook

More than 1,000 people packed into the Geneva’s Basilique Notre-Dame for the funeral of Lee Jong-wook, Director-General of the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), paying tribute to a man praised for his passion for his work and his kindness to his fellow human beings. “One of the last things he did was, on Friday night, to rush out and buy a take-away Chinese meal for two staff who were working late,” the head of Dr. Lee’s office, Bill Kean, told the mourners at yesterday’s ceremony. Dr. Lee, who died on Monday after suffering a stroke on Saturday, was a “man of action,” whose adventurous spirit led him to “experience more, see more, and do more,” his son, Tadahiro, said. “This spirit made him great at work, and great at life.”Tadahiro said his father gave 100 per cent of his attention to each one of the people he cared about, and to the issues he was passionate about. Dr. Lee became WHO chief in July 2003. Before that, he had worked for more than 20 years for the agency, first battling leprosy in the South Pacific islands, then tackling vaccine-preventable diseases, including polio. “Dr Lee’s work defined and exemplified the very best of WHO,” his compatriot Rhyu Si-min, Health and Welfare Minister of the Republic of Korea, said on behalf of the international health community.“He wanted change to take place on the ground. He travelled great distances, to more than 60 countries in three years. And he would never hesitate to travel the distance across the floor to take the hand of a child who was sick. His work has touched millions, and has made their lives better.”Staff remembered Dr. Lee for his direct interest in their work. It was common for him to drop by someone’s office to find out what they were doing, or to call WHO representatives in country offices and ask them how things were going. “He was never off duty. His agile mind was constantly turning over situations, plans and ideas. He never stopped thinking,” Dr. Kean said.Deputy UN Secretary-General Mark Malloch Brown represented Secretary-General Kofi Annan. Other UN Agency heads present included Ann Veneman, Executive Director of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF0, Peter Piot, Executive Director of the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), and Juan Somavia, Director-General of the International Labour Organization (ILO).His widow has requested that in lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Dr. Lee should be given to the project where she works, Socios En Salud in Lima, Peru. Donations can be given via the sister organization of Socios En Salud, Partners In Health. read more

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Competition Season Continues for PT3

Just before the holidays, Pineau’s Tumbling and Trampoline Team (PT3) traveled to a meet in Gunnison. Seven athletes competed at the event and ended with the following scores:Rickelle Collins 111 (Pictured)Audacee Eden 111Brittany Longmore 112Kashley Rhodes 113Tylee Jensen 222Naomi Mathis 145Mackenna Payton 569Then, just a number of days later, PT3 competed in Helper at an event sponsored by Carbon County Recreation. Competitors and their scores were as follows:Rickelle Collins 111Skyler Oveson 111Tylee Jensen 112Kashley Rhodes 122Naomi Mathis 122Marisa Oveson 122Mersadie Oveson 123Nevaeh Whiting 122Audacee Eden 134Kambryn Iriart 135Indie Pikyavit 234Mackenna Payton 359Local judges for the Helper contest included Lily Smith, Granger West and Sierra Jensen.An in-house competition was also held in Helper during that time. Athletes that finished in the top three were as follows:1st – Makaya Vigor, Eliza Pitcher, Brylei Velasquez, Lanaya Pitcher, Nevaeh Whiting2nd – Berkli Tullio, Deagon Westover, Mariza Morrow, Kaylee Pitcher, N’aomi Smith3rd – Riley Westover, Malia Smith and Keyire MorrowPT3 would like to thank the following sponsors for their constant support: Wolverine Dugout Mine, Carbon Emery RV Inc., Wall Contractors Inc., Swire Coca Cola, and Full Circle Sign and Design. read more

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Barcelona scores late frustrates Atletico Madrid again

MADRID — Another late goal for Barcelona, another disappointing draw for Atletico Madrid.For the second consecutive year, Atletico wasn’t able to hold on to its lead against Barcelona at Wanda Metropolitano Stadium, missing another chance to end its winless streak against the Catalan club in the Spanish league.Ousmane Dembele’s 90th-minute goal gave Barcelona a 1-1 draw in Madrid on Saturday, extending its unbeaten run against Atletico to 17 leagues matches.Diego Costa put Atletico ahead in the 77th with his first league goal of the season.Last year, it was an 82nd-minute equalizer by Luis Suarez that denied Atletico.“We let it slip away,” Atletico coach Diego Simeone said. “Details made the difference.”Atletico hasn’t beaten Barcelona in the league since 2010, before Simeone took charge. It has only two wins against the Catalan club in 27 matches, both in the Champions League.The result kept Barcelona one point in front of Atletico at the top of the league, with Sevilla having a chance to move past both teams with a home win against Valladolid on Sunday.“Atletico is definitely a rival for us in the title race,” Barcelona coach Ernesto Valverde said. “It was important to salvage a draw.”Neither team created significant scoring chances until Costa’s close-range header on a corner taken by Antoine Griezmann.Dembele’s equalizer came from a low left-footed shot past goalkeeper Jan Oblak after a pass by Lionel Messi.Real Madrid dropped five points behind Barcelona after its perfect run under coach Santiago Solari came to an end with a shock 3-0 defeat at Eibar.MADRID’S SETBACKReal Madrid struggled on both sides of the field, never getting close to victory in its visit to Eibar.The attack was inefficient and defensive mistakes proved costly for Solari’s team as it lost to the Basque Country club for the first time.In his first match since being given the permanent coaching job, Solari was trying to win his fifth straight match since replacing the fired Julen Lopetegui.Gonzalo Escalante, Sergi Enrich and Kike Garcia scored at Ipurua Stadium.“Eibar played with real heart and that was clear for all to see,” Solari said. “They played extremely well and we couldn’t match them. We have to congratulate them on a quality, complete performance.”Defeat left Madrid with one of the league’s worst defences, 19 goals conceded. Only four teams have conceded more.Barcelona also has conceded 19 goals after 13 matches.VALENCIA’S RUNValencia easily defeated relegation-threatened Rayo Vallecano 3-0 for its fourth win in its last five matches in all competitions.Santi Mina scored twice and Kevin Gameiro once for the hosts, which had won only once in their first 13 games.The good run moved Valencia to ninth in the standings, safely away from the relegation zone.Rayo Vallecano, second-to-last in the standings and winless since its third match of the season, played the final minutes with 10 men after Luis Advincula was shown his second yellow card.HUESCA STAYS LASTHuesca drew with Levante 2-2, staying in last place and extending its winless streak to 12 matches.Playing in the first division for the first time, Huesca hasn’t won since the first round.___More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports___Tales Azzoni on Twitter: http://twitter.com/tazzoniTales Azzoni, The Associated Press read more

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12year open pit life for Desert Scheelite pilot mountain scoping study

first_imgThe Board of Thor Mining reports the results of a scoping study for the Pilot Mountain tungsten project in Nevada, USA. Highlights:Desert Scheelite operational life of 12 years with open pit mining over 11 years and one additional year to complete processingTotal Desert Scheelite forecast open pit production of 7.5 MtAnnual throughput of 650,000 t from the Desert Scheelite open pit, producing scheelite concentrates and copper silver concentrates, plus zinc silver concentratesPreliminary analysis also suggests some potential for economic mining and processing from the higher grade Garnet deposit (inferred resource), supplementing production from Desert ScheelitePre-tax profit expectations from initial open pit operations ranging from $125 million base case from Desert Scheelite, up to $317 million, which includes improved scheelite recovery, reduced mining costs at greater throughput volumes and the potential inclusion of Garnet mine productionStudy outcomes support a decision to commence a more detailed PFS to progress the project along the development pathwayNo current primary tungsten production in USA where tungsten is classified as a “Critical Mineral”.Mick Billing, Executive Chairman of Thor Mining, commented: “I am delighted to release the results of the scoping study for the Pilot Mountain project showing potential for at least a medium term life on one, and potentially two, of the four tungsten deposits at 100% owned Pilot Mountain.”“Closed circuit metallurgical test work on Desert Scheelite ore has commenced which will, hopefully, upgrade the results of open circuit work previously conducted, which achieved 72% recovery of scheelite and saleable quality concentrates. The impact of any improvement is outlined below in this report.“The Pilot Mountain project hosts four known deposits, and it is anticipated that each of these has potential to contribute further as we continue to explore their potential.“With no US domestic production, and tungsten classified by the US Department of the Interior as a Critical Mineral, our objective is to re-start Unites States commercial mining and tungsten concentrate production after a significant break.“We look forward to providing regular updates on this project as material developments occur.”In late 2017, Thor commissioned Andrew Vidale Consulting Services (AVCS) to prepare a scoping study for the Pilot Mountain tungsten project to gain an understanding of the potential viability of the project to sustain mining and processing. The study terms of reference for AVCS were subsequently refined to cover the Desert Scheelite deposit only.An assessment by US based consultants Practical Mining LLC has indicated possible additional open cut and underground potential from the Garnet deposit nearby.The results of these studies show:Desert Scheelite• A 12 year life of processing ore from open pit operations at Desert Scheelite• Contract mining over 11 years to deliver forecast mine production to the proposed processing plant• Annual forecast throughput of 650,000 t from Desert Scheelite, generating approximately 1,000 t/y of scheelite in concentrate• Capital Expenditure range of $30 to $35 million• Project payback of 36 months on the base case, reducing to less than 18 if metallurgical test work, currently under way, is successful in improving recovery to 85% or above.Garnet (based on Inferred resources)• Initial open pit transitioning to small scale underground• Supplementary ore feed averaging 120,000 t/y• Reduction in project payback to less than 18 months.last_img read more

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If you dont regulate the FAI who does Sport Ireland faces questions

first_img 62 Comments 22,550 Views https://jrnl.ie/4575573 Apr 3rd 2019, 5:41 PM Short URL ‘If you don’t regulate the FAI, who does?’: Sport Ireland faces questions over FAI and the €100k loan Sport Ireland, which provides funding each year to the FAI, said it isn’t satisfied with what the FAI has said so far. We think we should be able to get an answer quicker than that. Circumstances of the loan, how it was paid back, the need for it. It shouldn’t be too hard to explain.As per the agreement that exists between Sport Ireland and the FAI, the FAI must notify if there is a material deterioration in its finances. Treacy indicated that it would have indeed breached these terms of conditions if the FAI failed to disclose financial difficulties in the context of the €100k loan. Treacy was asked if he had confidence in the FAI board. He replied: “Well, I’m not saying ‘yes’.”He was also asked about John Delaney’s new role within the FAI of Executive Vice President, and said he was surprised Sport Ireland wasn’t consulted.“Today is not a good day for sport to be in here talking about governance within the FAI,” Treacy said.However, both Treacy and Sport Ireland chair Kieran Mulvey stressed that they didn’t want there to be an adverse effect on the people who play football and work at grassroots levels if funding was withheld from the FAI.To date, it is happy that the funding it provides goes towards the programmes they’re intended for.And while Sport Ireland provides taxpayer money and audits the FAI every few years, governance of the organisation rests with the board of the FAI.It provoked this question from Ruth Coppinger : “If you don’t regulate the FAI, who does?”Treacy replied that, under the legislation, Sport Ireland doesn’t have the power to do so, and uses what leverage it has infrequently as denying funding could put jobs in jeopardy.He was also asked if he felt it strange that the CEO of the FAI gets paid more than, for example, the Taoiseach.Treacy replied: “I did think strange.”In a statement, Sinn Féin TD Imelda Munster said that the response from Sport Ireland today was “telling”. “The FAI receives substantial funding from the state, and they must be held to account,” she said.I am not surprised that they can’t express confidence in the board, given all that’s come to light in recent weeks and the very weak response from the FAI in this time.John Delaney is set to appear before the Oireachtas Committee next week alongside other FAI officials.Munster added: “Next week’s meeting with be hugely significant, and hopefully it will shed some light on the bizarre goings-on at the FAI.”center_img SPORT IRELAND IS set to write to the FAI tomorrow and say that its explanation thus far over a €100,000 loan given to the organisation by former CEO John Delaney “falls far short” from what is expected.John Treacy, CEO of Sport Ireland, was among representatives fielding questions from the Oireachtas Committee on Transport, Tourism and Sport this afternoon.In his opening statement, Treacy said Sport Ireland has already asked the FAI for urgent clarification as to the circumstances of the €100k loan – details of which were first revealed in the Sunday Times – and its repayment.Sport Ireland is the statutory agency that provides Exchequer funding to sporting organisations across the country, including the FAI. Last year, it gave the FAI almost €3 million. So far, the FAI hasn’t provide a satisfactory answer over the €100k loan, Treacy said, and a new review commissioned by the FAI by independent firm Mazars isn’t a “legitimate” reason for the FAI to withhold answers.Treacy told the committee that Sport Ireland will write to the FAI again tomorrow and, if satisfactory answers are not provided, its board will hold a meeting on Tuesday to discuss potential sanctions against the FAI – which could include withholding funding.He said he was aware that cash flow has been issue for the FAI. “But we have no idea why that loan was given,” Treacy said. “That’s why we’re asking the question.  Share127 Tweet Email Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By Sean Murray Wednesday 3 Apr 2019, 5:41 PMlast_img read more

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Fairbanks Hatchery Opening Doors To Public

first_imgThe Ruth Burnett Sport Fish Hatchery in Fairbanks will open its doors to the public during this weekend’s Outdoors Show. Public outreach and education are part of the $46 million state hatchery’s mission, and a visitor’s center is required by its borough land lease. The hatchery has been operating for more than 2 years but the visitor’s center hasn’t opened.Download Audiolast_img

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UA president touts plan to save state money

first_imgDownload AudioUniversity of Alaska President Jim Johnsen is touting a restructuring plan called “Strategic Pathways” as a way to save the state money.UA president Jim Johnsen (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)The plan, presented to the Board of Regents last week, would reorganize the system into three “lead” universities, but it lacks specifics about how much money it would save, or which programs might be on the chopping block.Johnsen told reporters today it’s in the University’s interest to withhold those details for now.“When we start naming particular programs, then people know exactly who’s in those programs and they start doing things like leaving,” said Johnsen. “They start doing things like not enrolling next term, etc. And so we end up with some very negative impacts in this. uncertain situation”Johnsen also fielded questions about a proposal by Rep. Tammie Wilson that would cut the University budget from the $331 million dollars in the Governor’s budget down to $288 million.Wilson told the House Finance Subcommittee last week her budget plan only contains money for what the University considers “student instruction.” It would eliminate funds for research and for outreach programs like the Marine Advisory Program.“I did hear from Rep. Wilson today that the general fund support for intercollegiate athletics,which is about $8 million per year, is included within the $288 [million],” Johnsen said. “So that’s a clarification I learned from her this morning, but outside of it is research and outreach.”Johnsen is headed to Juneau this week to meet with lawmakers and defend his Strategic Pathways plan, which is meant to take shape over a three-year period.He said a dramatic budget cut like Wilson’s would force the process to go much more quickly… and would make for a much leaner institution.“There will much less choice in terms of academic majors for students,” said Johnsen. “There will likely be less research that happens, meaning much less outside revenue will come into the University. It’ll be a lot more houses on the market for sale. It’ll be a lot fewer people who are shopping at Fred Meyer and buying your newspapers. It’ll be a serious hit on our capacity to serve the state.”Johnsen said the university has provided Wilson with “extensive information” about the types of research conducted at the University.The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner is reporting Wilson has put the University budget on hold while she seeks a more detailed breakdown on how research is paid for and who it benefits.The subcommittee had planned to finish its work on the university’s budget Tuesday. The next meeting is scheduled for Wednesday at 7 p.m.last_img read more

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Citing irregularities 26 candidates boycott election

first_img.As many as 25 Jatiya Oikya Front candidates and one independent contestant have announced to boycott the election, citing various irregularities, including vote rigging and capturing of polling stations by ruling party men, according to UNB.They made the announcement halfway through as they alleged that ruling party men captured polling stations, rigged votes and barred voters from casting votes in their constituencies.The Oikya Front candidates who boycotted the election are Mohammad Shahjahan (Noakhali-4), Fahim Chowdhury (Sherpur-2), Mahmudul Haque Rubel (Sherpur-3), Mia Golam Parwar (Khulna-5), Sunil Shuvo Roy (Khulna-1), Abul Kalam Azad (Khulna-6), Rafiqul Islam Bakul (Khulna-3), Azizul Bari Helal (Khulna-4), Mir Ezaz Khan (Khulna-1), Iqbal Hossain (Pabna-5), Gazi Nazrul Islam (Satkhira-4), Moniruzzaman Montu (Nilphamari-2), Azizul Islam (Nilphamari-3), JM Nurur Rahman (Barishal-4), Rumana Rashid Kanak Chapa (Sirajganj-1), Rumana Mahmud (Sirajganj-2), Abdul Manan Talukder (Sirajganj-3), Maulana Rafiqul Islam Khan (Sirajganj-4), Masud Rana (Bagerhat-1), MA Salam (Bagerhat-2), Abdul Wadud (Bagerhat-3), Abdul Alim (Bagerhat-4), AKM Nasir Uddin (Shariatpur-1, Shafiqur Rahman Kiron (Shariatpur-2) and M Samsuzzoha Khan (Naogaon-2), and independent candidate Salma Islam (Dhaka-1).last_img read more

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About 100 People Displaced After New Carrolton Fire

first_imgBy Hamil R. Harris, Special to the AFRONearly 100 people were displaced and an entire building was destroyed Monday as a result of a three-alarm blaze that caused more than $2 million worth of damages to a New Carrollton Apartment complex.“It is amazing that with a fire of this size there were no injuries,” said Prince George’s County Fire Department spokesman Mark Brady about a fire that took place in the 5300 block of 85th Avenue.”The remnants of a completely destroyed apartment building after a fire on the 5300 blocok of 85th Avenue in New Carrolton, Maryland. (Courtesy Photo)The morning after the September 17 blaze residents of the massive complex could only look and take photos of their charred building.“I was coming from work and my wife called and said the building was on fire,” said one man who declined to give his name. “My children are all safe.”Many other residents stood in front of the building and just looked at a structure that had a roof, which was partially collapsed. Brady said the cause of the fire “is still under investigation.”Brady said firefighters began to work with the fire around  3:30 p.m. but were hampered because “the water pressure in the fire hydrants was low,” and as a result water lines had to be connected to sources provided by the Washington Suburban and Sanitarian Commission.Despite being stretched thin because of Hurricane Florence, the National Capital Region of the American Red Cross responded to the fire Monday night to help families by placing them in hotels.last_img read more

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How is Modi spending crores on meetings CM to seek EC probe

first_imgHeria, Nimtouri (East Midnapore): Trinamool Congress will write to the Election Commission of India, to conduct an inquiry into the expenditure incurred at the meetings that are being addressed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, said Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee on Sunday.”Look how Modi is spending money at the election meetings. He is spending crores of rupees at the meetings, flouting ECI norms. Who is Modi? There is no special rule for him. We will write to the ECI to conduct an inquiry into the expenditure incurred at his meetings. We want to know the source as well. It is public money,” Banerjee said, adding: “In Varanasi, Modi spent more than a crore to conduct the meeting.” She addressed two meetings at Heria and Nimtouri on Sunday afternoon. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataComing down heavily on Modi and RSS, Banerjee alleged that “Modi is not talking about the development carried out by the Centre in the past five years. He is talking about Hindutva to win elections. In India, people from different religious communities have lived peacefully and happily for thousands of years. If the country belongs only to the Hindus then should we drive out or kill the people belonging to other religious communities? There will be communal riots every day.” Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateThe Trinamool supremo said that in the election rallies, Modi is speaking “lies and lies only.” “He is saying that no Durga Puja is held in Bengal. This is absolutely false. If no Durga Puja is held then why did his party go to the High Court challenging the state government’s decision to give Rs 10,000 to the clubs? Also, why did the Income Tax send notice to 40 Durga Puja clubs asking them to furnish the details of expenditure? Modi does not do any home work and deliberately tells lies to create confusion among the people,” she added. She also alleged that the saffron party has engaged agencies to bring people to the rallies or put up their flags, by paying huge amounts of money to them. “The workers do not put up posters or bring people to the rallies. They do it through agencies. We want a probe into the matter and want to know how much money BJP has given to the agencies,” she stated. Banerjee said that in the past seven years, all-round development has taken place in East Midnapore. Digha is coming up as a major tourist spot. The schemes taken up by the state government have helped people coming from all walks of life. The students have been benefitted by Kanyashree, Yubashree and the Swami Vivekananda scholarship. Khadya Sathi has helped poor people as they get one kilogram of rice at Rs 2. She urged the people to cast their votes in favour of party candidates Sisir Adhikari and Dibyendu Adhikari. “On May 12 when election will be held in Tamluk, Kanthi and Ghatal constituencies, case your votes in favour of Trinamool candidates to oust BJP from the Centre,” she said.last_img read more

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The Body of President Zachary Taylor was Exhumed and Tested for Poison

first_imgZachary Taylor is not a particularly well-known president, but he had one of the strangest terms in history. Conspiracy theories abound about U.S. presidents who have passed away while in office. We’ve all heard them and many have curiously considered the speculative what-ifs. In the case of one late commander-in-chief, however, the digging into his strange end went beyond idle interest. More than a century afterwards, Zachary Taylor’s body was exhumed and tested for poisoning.Taylor, the United State’s 12th president, had been elected in March 1849. Serving only 16 months, he died five days after becoming sick after eating a bowl of raw cherries and iced milk. He had just returned from a July 4th dedication of the Washington Monument, and after eating the snack, complained of severe stomach cramps and took to his bed. Acute gastroenteritis was the diagnosis at the time.Daguerreotype of Taylor at the White House by Mathew Brady, 1849.The 65-year-old, who had been in otherwise good health, was laid to rest for several months at Washington, D.C., Congressional Cemetery, then moved to the family plot in Louisville, Kentucky.And that seemed to be that for more than 100 years.But in the 1970s and ’80s, conspiracy theories began emerging that Taylor’s death might have been more sinister. The biggest proponent of this theory was Clara Rising, a researcher and professor at the University of Florida who was working on a book on Taylor. She noted there were powerful interests that he had disappointed, people who felt they had a lot at stake.Death of General Z. Taylor, 12th President of the United States.Taylor had been a career military officer and rose to be a national war hero in the Mexican-American War. Before then, in fighting against the Seminole, he earned the nickname “Old Rough and Ready.” He was reluctant when he was approached to run for president by the Whig party, but finally gave in.His platform was never clear, but it was a time when tensions were rising over slavery in the country. Many wanted to expand slaveholding to the newly acquired Western territories.Taylor, who came from a prominent planter family with Kentucky and Virginia ties, was a slaveholder himself. Other slaveholders expected to find him their ally when he took the country’s top office. Instead, he wanted to bring in the new territories as free states.Official White House portrait of Zachary Taylor.As tensions rose, Taylor seemed to make things worse by keeping his distance from Congress and even his own cabinet. Conspiracy theorists like Rising looked at the suddenness of Taylor’s death and the growing political maelstrom of the time as evidence he may have been poisoned by enemies, likely by arsenic. And Rising and others were able to find a living descendant of Taylor’s for permission to exhume his body for tissue samples to check the theory.Related Video:“The suspicions are really in the history books,” Rising told the New York Times. “Right after his death, everything he had worked against came forward and was passed by both houses of Congress.”President Zachary Taylor standing in front of his Cabinet,If her theory was true, Taylor would have been the first president assassinated in office. So in 1991, the former president’s remains were exhumed to be tested by a team of Kentucky medical examiners.Uniformed officers from the Department of Veterans Affairs stood at attention as as Taylor’s flag-draped walnut coffin was taken to a hearse and on to medical facilities. They were quickly returned the same day. No signs of poisoning were found, and nothing much else of interest, except that Taylor had been a tooth-grinder.Taylor’s mausoleum at the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky.And so Taylor was relegated back to his place in history – ranked by historians as one of the most forgettable presidents of the nation.But there is a footnote to his death that seems to hold more credence than the poisoning theory, and that is that his death was more likely caused by shoddy medical treatment to the cramps he developed.Zachary TaylorAccording to records, he was given opium and ipecac to induce vomiting, as well as bleeding and blistering treatments relied on in the day. Some believe Taylor would have had a better chance at survival with no treatment.Read another story from us: Thomas Jefferson: Emancipator or Enslaver of Men?While Taylor’s exhumation to check for poisoning is unique, the bodies of other presidents have been disturbed for various reasons – such as Ulysses S. Grant’s body’s transfer to Grant’s Tomb in New York City years after he died. Assassinated President Abraham Lincoln’s coffin was opened four times, just to establish that he was really in there.Terri Likens’ byline has appeared in newspapers around the world through The Associated Press. She has also done work for ABCNews, the BBC, and magazines that include High Country News, American Profile, and Plateau Journal. She lives just east of Nashville, Tenn.last_img read more

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Charles Darwins Grandfather – The True Founder of Evolutionary Theory

first_imgWhen Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859, it opened up a dialogue that would change our understanding of life on earth. As one of the key thinkers behind natural selection, his role in the advancement of human knowledge cannot but understated.Darwin biographer Joseph Carell describes On the Origin of Species as “one of the two or three most significant works of all time — one of those works that fundamentally and permanently alter our vision of the world.”Charles Darwin c. 1881.Ideas, just like species, evolve over time and Darwin’s revolutionary concepts did not exist in a vacuum.Around 50 years before Darwin’s trip on the HMS Beagle, his grandfather Erasmus Darwin published his thoughts on evolution, a theory we now know today as the survival of the fittest.HMS BeagleErasmus Darwin was born the youngest of seven children in Nottinghamshire, England in 1731. The son of a physician and lawyer, he went onto study classics and mathematics at Cambridge then had three years of medical training at the University of Edinburgh.It’s not clear whether he finished his medical degree but he ran a successful medical practice in Lichfield, Staffordshire for more than fifty years, earning a fellowship from the Royal Society.Portrait of Erasmus Darwin by Joseph Wright of Derby (1792).His practice was so successful that George III invited him to be his Royal Physician, a position he declined.The elder Darwin fully embraced the ideas of the Enlightenment and was a founding member of the Lunar Society, an informal but influential dinner club that supported the French and American revolutions, supported the abolition of slavery, and was one of the driving forces behind the industrial revolution.Erasmus Darwin House, Lichfield, England. Photo by Bs0u10e01 CC BY-SA 3.0He was also a supporter of education for girls, helping to fund a boarding school set up by two of his daughters.Erasmus Darwin was a prolific experimenter and is acknowledged as the creator of the Ackerman Linkage steerage system which is still used in cars today.He also invented a horizontal windmill, a copying machine, a voice machine, and several weather monitoring instruments.Erasmus Darwin oil on canvas, probably 1770s.Darwin also hypothesized a hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine characterized by an elongated combustion chamber and expansion nozzle.Darwin didn’t get to test this theory in his lifetime and it would take another 100 years before the works of scientists like Konstantin Tsiolkovsky would make rocket propulsion a reality.Darwin’s hypothesis did, however, successfully show that the volume of hydrogen needed to be greater than the volume of oxygen and his general theory is still being used today by NASA.Erasmus Darwin’s holograph manuscript. Photo by Wellcome Images CC BY 4.0When Erasmus was not inventing, he turned his eye to transcribing and writing textbooks. His most notable work is the first Latin to English translation of the Systema Vegetabilium, an influential system of plant classification based modern botany.Darwin was also a passionate natural scientist and was the first person to understand and describe the process of photosynthesis and to describe the formation of clouds.Darwin is described by the team at Erasmus Darwin house as “friendly, generous, sociable, full of teasing humor, and, according to his friend James Keir, ‘paid little regard to authority.’”Title page to ‘Letter to Erasmus Darwin…,’ 1793. Photo by Wellcome Images CC BY 4.0His reputation has at various times been attacked or revered depending on who is in charge of the narrative.Erasmus Darwin has been called an exploitative capitalist and lost favor among his critics due to his religious skepticism.To his fans, he was a major thinker whose work would influence Romantic thinkers such as Lord Byron and Mary Shelley and is seen as the true forefather of evolutionary theory.Read another story from us: Charles Darwin, the father of the theory of evolution, was married to his first cousinAlthough Erasmus Darwin died seven years before the birth of his more famous grandson, we know that Charles Darwin studied the works of his grandfather with great interest and this helped inform his own ideas of evolution as a young man.last_img read more

Read More Charles Darwins Grandfather – The True Founder of Evolutionary Theory

HP Spectre x360 OLED vs Apple MacBook Pro Which 15Inch Laptop Wins

first_img5 HP Spectre x360 Overall (100) Colors 15.6 inches, 3840 x 2160 Editors’ Note: Apple has announced a new version 15-inch MacBook Pro with an improved keyboard and faster 8-core processor. We will update this face-off once we’ve had a chance to test that model.HP’s Spectre x360 just recently burst out of the gate with a new, gorgeous 15.6-inch 4K OLED display for just $1,799. But how does that compare with the 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro, which boasts a 15.4-inch Retina display?The MacBook Pro starts at a much steeper $2,399 and our test unit costs $4,699.MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro: Which 13-inch MacBook Is Right For You?Apple’s entry-level MacBook Air and Pro look pretty similar, but our testing proved they differ in crucial ways.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Which Cheap Tablet Is Best? Amazon Fire 7 vs Walmart Onn02:45关闭选项Automated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/hp-spectre-x360-15-oled-vs-macbook-pro-15?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0003:4603:46 Here’s how these two premium laptops stack up.HP Spectre x360 OLED vs. Apple MacBook Pro: Specs Compared Core i9-8950HK (Core i7 available) $1,479 ($1,799) Design (10) 18 Core i7-8565U (Core i7-8750H available) Graphics Keyboard and Touchpad (15) Rami Tabari, on 16GB Apple MacBook Pro 15-inch 15 4 pounds Weight 76 Space Gray (Silver available) 32GB (16GB available) 7 Display (15) Author Bio 81 Size SSD 14.2 x 9.8 x 0.8 inches 15.4 inches, 2880 x 1800 1TB SSD 4.45 pounds AMD Radeon 560X (Radeon Pro 555X available) RAMcenter_img Battery Life (20) Dark Ash Silver (Poseidon Blue available) by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeKelley Blue Book5 Mid-engine Corvettes That Weren’tKelley Blue BookUndoGrepolis – Free Online GameGamers Around the World Have Been Waiting for this GameGrepolis – Free Online GameUndoAncestryStart your journey with AncestryDNA®- now $59. Ends 8/26.AncestryUndoCNN International for ANAWhy Tennis Pundits Are Tipping This WomanCNN International for ANAUndoForbes.com12 House Renovation Mistakes, In PicturesForbes.comUndoMayo ClinicManaging psoriatic arthritis painMayo ClinicUndoAdvertisement However, the MacBook Pro is still a beast. It’s way more powerful, and its battery lasted much longer on our tests. And while the display isn’t OLED-great, it’s still excellent.But overall, the Spectre x360 is the way to go if you’re willing to sacrifice some performance, especially for the price.Credit: Laptop Mag Two Thunderbolt 3, one USB Type-A, HDMI, headphone jack, a microSD card slot Nvidia GeForce MX150 (GTX 1050 Ti available) 7 $2,399 ($4,699) 9 CPU 12 HP Spectre x360 DesignBoth the Spectre x360 and MacBook Pro sport premium aluminum designs, but each laptop has a unique style. The MacBook Pro’s Space Gray design is elegant, but it’s starting to show its age. On the other hand, the Spectre x360’s Dark Ash Silver breaks the common color palette of many premium notebooks and even adds sleek copper luxe accents. The Spectre x360’s body also has sharp, diamond-cut edges that make it stand out more than the MacBook Pro’s soft, curved corners.When it comes to the interior, the Spectre x360 still has the edge on color, but the MacBook Pro looks neater around the bezels. The Spectre x360’s side bezels are slightly slimmer, but its top and bottom bezels are gigantic compared with the MacBook Pro’s.However, the Spectre x360 2-in-1 touch-screen design is infinitely more useful than the Touch Bar that the MacBook Pro offers. When I asked our reviewer and longtime Mac user Henry T. Casey about the Touch Bar, he said that it “failed to deliver any significant value during its lifetime.” Let’s not forget that the Spectre x360 also comes with a stylus.The MacBook Pro has a slimmer and lighter body, coming in at 4 pounds and 13.8 x 9.5 x 0.6 inches, while the Spectre x360 weighs 4.45 pounds and measures 14.2 x 9.8 x 0.8 inches. But overall, the Spectre x360’s better features and overall design help it stand apart from the MacBook Pro.Winner: HP Spectre x360PortsAs you might imagine, the MacBook Pro doesn’t win many port battles, and this fight is no different. The MacBook Pro offers only four ThunderBolt 3 ports and a headphone jack, while the Spectre x360 features two Thunderbolt 3 ports, one USB Type-A port, an HDMI port, a headphone jack and a microSD card slot.Winner: HP Spectre x360DisplayNothing beats OLED, baby. Sure, the MacBook Pro’s 15.4-inch, 2880 x 1800 Retina display is nothing to scoff at, but it pales in comparison to the Spectre x360’s 15.6-inch, 3840 x 2160 OLED panel.I watched the Godzilla: King of the Monsters TV spot on both systems, and during the establishing shot with the Capitol Hill, the red and orange colors from the fires and the sun in the background looked more rich and bold on the Spectre x360’s panel.When Millie Bobby Brown was hanging out in a server room, her surroundings were slightly brighter on the MacBook Pro’s screen. But this seemed to be a result of the higher contrast, since it washed out some of Brown’s complexion. On the Spectre x360’s panel, Brown’s face retained multiple shades of pink, which looked more realistic. Meanwhile, Kyle Chandler’s stubble was sharp on both displays.According to our colorimeter, the Spectre x360’s screen covers a wild 258% of the sRGB color gamut, destroying the MacBook Pro’s 117%. And in terms of brightness, the Spectre x360 emitted a whopping 483 nits, which again blows past the MacBook Pro’s 354 nits.The Spectre x360 also crushes it when it comes to color accuracy, hitting a Delta-E of 0.19 (lower is better) compared with the MacBook Pro’s 0.25.Winner: HP Spectre x360Keyboard and TouchpadDespite the MacBook Pro’s oh-so-many keyboard problems, the laptop’s keyboard feels relatively clicky — and even pleasant — after extended use. However, there’s no beating the Spectre x360’s keyboard, which features deeper travel, punchier feedback and a full-size number pad.The Spectre x360’s keys measure at 1.3 millimeters of travel and require 70 grams of force to actuate, while the MacBook Pro’s keys travel at 0.7 mm and require 63 g of force. Both fail to meet our 1.5 to 2.0 mm of preferred key travel, but they each met our 60-g minimum requirement for actuation force.I nailed 74 words per minute on the Spectre x360’s keyboard on the 10fastfingers.com typing test, while I managed a slightly slower 71 wpm with the MacBook Pro’s keyboard.When it comes to touchpads, the MacBook Pro has more real estate, at 6.3 x 3.9 inches, but it doesn’t have the pleasant click that the Spectre x360’s 4.7 x 2.3-inch touchpad does. Where HP uses a standard touchpad that you have to press down on, Apple’s Force Touch trackpad actually doesn’t move; instead, it provides haptic feedback to simulate a click.Winner: HP Spectre x360Performance and GraphicsThe MacBook Pro’s Intel Core i9-8950HK CPU with 32GB of RAM completely overshadows the Spectre x360’s Core i7-8565U processor with 16GB of RAM in every possible way you could think of.On the Geekbench 4 overall performance test, the MacBook Pro scored 23,138, which somersaults over the Spectre x360’s 16,096.MORE: The Laptops with the Best Overall PerformanceThe MacBook Pro converted a 4K movie to 1080p in 10 minutes and 16 seconds on our HandBrake benchmark, while the Spectre x360 took twice as long to complete it, finishing in 21 minutes and 13 seconds.Apple’s 2TB SSD crushed it, producing write speeds of 2,600 megabytes per second and read speeds of 2,724 MBps on the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test. When the Spectre x360’s 1TB copied 4.97GB of data, it did so at a sluggish rate of 424 MBps.When it came to graphics, the Spectre x360’s Nvidia GeForce MX150 actually came out on top, nailing 118 frames per second on the Dirt 3 benchmark (Medium, 1080p). That surpasses the MacBook Pro (AMD Radeon Pro 560X GPU), which averaged 84 fps on 1650 x 1050 and 73 fps on 2048 x 1280.When we ran the OpenGL portion of the Cinebench R15 benchmark, which measures graphics performance, the MacBook Pro scored 106 fps, while the Spectre x360 fell behind, at 91 fps.Winner: Apple MacBook ProBattery LifeFor two laptops with high-res displays, the MacBook Pro and Spectre x360 both have commendable battery life — but the MacBook wins this round by a landslide. On the Laptop Mag Battery Test (continuous web surfing over Wi-Fi), the MacBook Pro survived 10 hours and 20 minutes, which is nearly 3 hours longer than the Spectre x360’s 7 hours and 46 minutes.MORE: Laptops with Best Battery Life – Longest Lasting Laptop BatteriesHowever, the good thing about OLED panels is that whenever a pixel is black, that pixel effectively shuts down and conserves power. So when we continuously ran through episodes of the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina on Netflix at 150 nits of brightness, the Spectre x360 OLED lasted 8 hours and 40 minutes. But that runtime still doesn’t come close to the MacBook Pro’s.Winner: Apple MacBook ProValue and ConfigurationsBoth of these machines are relatively configurable, but the 15-inch MacBook Pro is a lot more expensive.The starting model of the Spectre x360 15 costs $1,479 and is outfitted with an Intel Core i7-8565U processor, an Nvidia GeForce MX150 GPU, 16GB of RAM, a 256GB SSD and a non-OLED 4K display. The Spectre x360 that I tested costs $1,799. This model comes in Dark Ash Silver and is outfitted with a Core i7-8565U processor, an MX150 GPU, 16GB of RAM, a 1TB SSD and a 4K OLED display.Buy the HP Spectre x360 OLEDThe MacBook Pro costs nearly $1,000 more than the Spectre x360 15 to start. For $2,399, you get a Core i7 CPU, a Radeon Pro 555X GPU, 16GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD. The price of our review model is $4,699 and includes a Core i9-8950HK CPU, an AMD Radeon 560X GPU, 32GB of RAM and a 2TB SSD.Buy the MacBook Pro 15-inchThe Spectre x360’s all-out version is still cheaper than the starting price of the MacBook Pro. For $2,199, you get a Core i7-8750H processor, a more powerful GTX 1050 Ti Max-Q GPU, 16GB of RAM and a 2TB SSD.As far as configuring the MacBook Pro goes, it costs $400 to upgrade to a Core i9 CPU, another $400 for 32GB of RAM, $200 more for a 512GB SSD, $600 extra for a 1TB drive and $1,400 for 2TB.Winner: HP Spectre x360Bottom LineIf you’re in the market for a premium 15-inch laptop, the HP Spectre x360 (OLED) beats the 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro. HP’s system wins on design, ports, keyboard, value and especially the display. 10 Performance (20) 14 19 13 Rami Tabari, Apple MacBook Pro 15-inch Value and Configs (10) 8 Starting Price (As Configured) 13.8 x 9.5 x 0.6 inches 15 5 Display Four Thunderbolt 3, headphone jack As soon as Rami Tabari sprung out of the College of Staten Island, he hit the ground running as a Staff Writer for Laptop Mag. He reviews every shape and form of a laptop as well as all sorts of cool tech. You can find him sitting at his desk surrounded by a hoarder’s dream of laptops, and when he navigates his way out to civilization, you can catch him watching really bad anime or playing some kind of painfully difficult game. He’s the best at every game and he just doesn’t lose. That’s why you’ll occasionally catch his byline in Tom’s Guide, taking on the latest Souls-like challenge. Ports Ports (10) 2TB SSDlast_img read more

Read More HP Spectre x360 OLED vs Apple MacBook Pro Which 15Inch Laptop Wins

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first_img News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | PACS | July 02, 2019 Laurel Bridge and 3M M*Modal Partner to Improve DICOM Structured Reporting July 2, 2019 — Laurel Bridge Software announced an expanded relationship with 3M M*Modal, a provider of clinical docu read more Feature | Information Technology | June 27, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr Smart Algorithm Extracts Data from Radiology Reports Radiology reports may contain information essential to figuring out a patient’s condition. read more News | PACS | June 26, 2019 Mini-PACS Solution for Image Management and Workflow Optimization ImageGrid Mini is a feature-rich, reliable and cost-effective image management and workflow optimization solution, pr read more News | Enterprise Imaging | June 27, 2019 Ambra Health Announces Integration With Box Ambra Health announced an integration with Box to enable the sharing of medical imaging directly from within Box’s… read more Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read more News | Enterprise Imaging | July 29, 2019 Philips Announces 10-year Enterprise Informatics Agreement With Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy Philips and Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, a leading academic hospital in the Grand Est… read more Technology | October 29, 2010 CTRM Solution Automates Critical Test Result Information News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more Related Content Technology | Enterprise Imaging | July 05, 2019 Hyland Healthcare Adds ImageNext Imaging Workflow Optimizer to Enterprise Imaging Suite Hyland Healthcare is launching ImageNext, a vendor-neutral imaging workflow optimizer that combines intelligent imaging… read more Veriphy 4.2, from Nuance Healthcare, is the latest release of the company’s critical test result management (CTRM) solution. It automates the delivery, verification and documentation of voice communications concerning critical test results (CTRs). The system helps ensure quick and auditable communication of patients’ urgent test results for improved risk management and reliable caregiver communication workflow. The new release integrates with PowerScribe 360, supports more PACS integrations and Vocera communication devices, allows for multisite IDN communication and brings improved message consumption and usability enhancements to the popular platform.For more information: www.nuance.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享last_img read more

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MRI Scan May Help Diagnose Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

first_img Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Neuro Imaging | September 12, 2016 MRI Scan May Help Diagnose Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy UCLA report finds new software tool could help determine whether a living person has CTE, which has been confirmable only in autopsies Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical School News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more center_img Related Content Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 07, 2019 Contrast Use in First Transthoracic Echocardiogram for Heart Failure Reduces Repeat Testing Heart failure is the fourth most common cause for all admission to U.S. hospitals, and it is the most common reason for… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more Comparing a PET scan of an NFL player’s brain, left, and an MRI of a former high school football player’s brain shows similar suspected CTE pathology in the midbrain. Image courtesy of UCLA Health.September 12, 2016 — University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) doctors have found what may be an earlier and easier way to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The disorder is thought to affect some former football players and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma.Using a new software tool for analyzing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the researchers detected the shrinkage of several key brain regions in a former football player with cognitive problems. The same pattern of brain changes is commonly seen in CTE cases that have been confirmed by autopsies after a person’s death.While the findings from this single case report are preliminary, they raise the possibility that MRI scans could be used to diagnose CTE and related conditions in living people. At present, CTE can be diagnosed only by direct examination of the brain during an autopsy.“Having an MRI-based technique for detecting this pattern of brain changes would help us a lot in assessing the brain health of athletes and others with histories of concussions,” said David Merrill, M.D., Ph.D., assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA.Along with its potential benefits in diagnosing patients in the clinic, the MRI scanning technique could also help speed research of CTE, helping scientists better understand its prevalence in the population and in studying potential therapies, said Cyrus Raji, M.D., Ph.D., a senior resident in radiology at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.Raji and Merrill are lead authors of the report, which appears online in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.The case’s patient, with the pseudonym “Bob Smith,” is a former high school fullback who also saw action on defense and special teams, meaning he was on the field for much of entire games. During his three-year playing career Smith received hundreds of blows to the head, including at least one concussion in which he was knocked unconscious and, after regaining consciousness, jogged to the wrong sideline.After finishing college, Smith married, raised a family and started a business with his wife. In his late 30s, he began to experience mood swings and difficulties with attention and impulse control. Eventually his problems affected his ability to work. He sought medical advice and was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder. Earlier this year, he sought medical help at Merrill’s UCLA Psychiatry Cognitive Health Clinic and Research Program. Standard neuropsychological testing confirmed Smith’s impairments in attention, impulse control and other measures of executive function, although it indicated that his memory was normal. An MRI scan showed no evidence of Alzheimer’s, stroke or dementia.The MRI scan did reveal a few small lesions consistent with Smith’s history of brain trauma. Merrill and Raji also used a new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared MRI software analysis tool called Neuroreader to measure the volumes of 45 different regions of the patient’s brain.“From one scan it can tell you which of those regions is abnormally large or small compared to a large database of normative brain volume,” Raji said of the software analysis tool. “Most importantly, we were able to see the progression of volume loss over time, because the patient had had another MRI done in 2012.”The analysis revealed abnormally low volumes for Smith’s brainstem, his ventral diencephalon and frontal lobes. The shrinkage in these volumes was worse in the later scan, suggesting a progression of disease. On the whole Smith’s brain lost about 14 percent of its total gray-matter volume (the volume taken up by brain cells, not nerve fibers) during the four-year interval.“The specific areas that were abnormally low in their volumes helped us understand that this patient’s cognitive symptoms were likely due to his history of traumatic brain injury,” Raji said.Researchers are trying to develop other methods for diagnosing CTE in the living, including positron emission tomography (PET) scans based on radioactive tracers that bind to tau aggregates. But an MRI-based method, which uses no radioactive materials, would be safer and less expensive, Merrill said.Merrill and colleagues now hope to do larger studies to analyze MRI data for people with histories of head trauma, which would help determine whether the technique is broadly useful in detecting CTE.Other authors of the study included Jorge Barrio and Gary Small, M.D., of UCLA, and Bennet Omalu, M.D., of UC Davis.For more information: www.ajgponline.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享last_img read more

Read More MRI Scan May Help Diagnose Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

VIDEO Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy

first_imgVideos | Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Recent Videos View all 606 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magid Awadalla discusses cardiac MRI use in breast radiotherapy patientsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:36Loaded: 2.52%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Conference Coverage View all 396 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videoslast_img read more

Read More VIDEO Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy

President Solís tells world leaders Costa Rica is a model of sustainable

first_imgRelated posts:The Guardian names Costa Rican journalist among ‘young climate campaigners to watch’ ahead of Paris 2015 World failing to meet emissions level required to stave off disastrous global warming, analysts say Costa Rica now will accept Syrian refugees after president reverses course Costa Rica backs away from 2021 carbon neutrality goal Costa Rica President Luis Guillermo Solís told world leaders gathered in New York this past weekend that his country’s sustainable development model is worthy of emulation.Solís touted Costa Rica’s green path in a speech Sunday at the United Nations’ Post-2015 Development Agenda Summit. He urged other nations to realign their spending away from militarization and towards peace efforts and the 2030 Agenda Development Goals adopted by the U.N.Solís said that Costa Rica is a country with sustainable development “in its DNA”:“Today we say that it is possible and we urge the creation of other societies that are peaceful, just, and inclusive, free of fear and violence. The 2030 Agenda is clear: sustainable development is not possible without peace, nor can peace exist without sustainable development,” Solís said, according to a transcript made available by Casa Presidencial.The president took encouragement from Pope Francis’ speech to the U.N. Friday, saying that the pontiff described Costa Rica when he spoke about caring for the planet, sustainable development and peace.“This is a pope thinking about the Costa Rican model,” Solís said in a statement after the speech Friday.The president highlighted Costa Rica’s decision to abolish its armed forces in 1948 and its focus on clean energy — including the 213 days so far this year that Costa Rica has been able to generate electricity using only renewable sources — and repeated the country’s pledge to become carbon neutral by 2021.The Costa Rican leader called on the seven permanent member states of the U.N. Security Council to lead by example and reduce military spending in favor of projects that would help end extreme poverty.“There is no better formula for security in their own countries than to guarantee sustainable development for the whole world,” Solís said.During the weekend, Solís also participated in the Beijing + 20 meeting on women’s rights and empowerment. The president called for an end to sex discrimination in all levels of society and pledged that Costa Rica would establish a quality seal to certify gender equality in businesses and institutions, among other goals.Solís also met briefly with the Arab League Secretary-General Nabil Elaraby to discuss the Syrian refugee crisis, the Islamic State group, and possible future investment opportunities in Costa Rica from the Middle East.Solís addresses the U.N. General Assembly Wednesday morning for the second time in his presidency. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Read More President Solís tells world leaders Costa Rica is a model of sustainable